The Psalms and the Life of Faith

By Walter Brueggemann; Patrick D. Miller | Go to book overview

7

Prayer as an Act of Daring Dance:
Four Biblical Examples

IN THE OLD TESTAMENT, relationship to God is best understood under the notion of covenant.1 This is so whether God's covenant partner is creation, the nations, Israel, or the individual person. I take the metaphor of covenant in the broadest possible way to refer to a relationship that matters intensely to both parties. In such an interaction, the action of either party may place the other at risk in serious covenanting, and each party submits to some governance or redefinition by the covenantal partner. This may seem so obvious that it is a truism. But if it is a truism, it is one that was asserted in Israel only with great struggle. That struggle is still underway among us in our theological understanding. The notion that God may be at risk in the covenantal relationship is a subversive idea.2 This conviction subverts the contractual, quid pro quo theology of the ancient Near East,3 and it intends to subvert all scholastic notions of theology that put God well beyond all the issues and the risks—notions that are powerful even today.

1. On the metaphor of covenant taken most broadly, see my essays "Covenant as
Subversive Paradigm" and "Covenant and Social Possibility," in W. Brueggemann, A
Social Reading of the Old Testament (see chap. 5, n. 21), 43–69, and chap. 8 in this
volume.

2. See my essay "A Shape for Old Testament Theology, II: Embrace of Pain," in
W. Brueggemann, Old Testament Theology (see chap. 5, n. 31), 22–44.

3. See my essay "A Shape for Old Testament Theology, I: Structure Legitima-
tion," in Brueggemann, Old Testament Theology, 1–21.

-135-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Psalms and the Life of Faith
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 292

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.