Martin Luther: His Road to Reformation, 1483-1521

By Martin Brecht; James L. Schaaf | Go to book overview

I

Ancestry, Schooling

1. ANCESTRY

Eisleben, the chief settlement in the county of Mansfeld, at the end of the fifteenth century was an aspiring city with more than 4,000 inhabitants, growing suburbs, and several churches1 (Plate I top). Martin Luther's life began and ended here. Yet, Luther was not a real Eislebener. Both his birth as well as his death in the same city instead had to do with the episodic circumstances of his life. Luther died in 1546 in the elegant house of the Drachstedt family next to St. Andrews Church while attempting to achieve a settlement between the estranged counts of Mansfeld. In St. Andrews Church he delivered his final sermons; there also he was laid out in death. Luther sometimes stayed in his order's monastery in the new part of the city at St. Anne's Church. During the Corpus Christi procession in 1515, he had one of his disturbing confrontations with Christ as judge there.2 Luther was born in a middle-class house located on Langen Gasse, today Dr. Lutherstrasse, in the Bridges Quarter (Brückenviertel), the southeast suburb (Plate I bottom). The house of his birth, which has since suffered a fire, is no longer preserved in its old condition. Yet today one can still imagine the original layout of the ground floor with vestibule, kitchen, living room, and bedroom, where presumably Luther was born. November 10, 1483, shortly before midnight, is considered the date of his birth, based chiefly on one of Melanchthon's statements.3 Neither Luther nor his mother was completely sure of the year of his birth later, however. At that time people were not always precise about such dates. Occasionally the years 1484 and 1482 are also mentioned. While 1484 can certainly be excluded as the year of his birth, a setting of the date in 1482 would remove definite difficulties in the chronology of Luther's youth, such as the four-year period of schooling in Eisenach, for which it is difficult to account, or the obtaining of the masters degree at the age of twenty-two at the beginning of 1505.4 Also because of the uncertainty over the date of his birth, Luther later had little concern for astrology and horoscopes. For him, the course of his life was one of miraculous leading. On the day following his birth, 11 November, Luther was baptized in the church of Sts. Peter and Paul, the parish church of the Bridges Quarter, presumably by the pastor, Bartholomew Bennebecher, and was given the name of the saint of the day, Martin. At that time the church

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Martin Luther: His Road to Reformation, 1483-1521
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 557

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.