Jane Austen: Pride and Prejudice and Emma

By Andrew Haggerty | Go to book overview

Chapter 2

Emma.

Emma is the second novel Austen completed, rather than simply revised, after she took up residence with her mother and sister at the cottage at Chawton. It is remarkably different in tone than the book that preceded it, Mansfield Park, which ends happily—as do all Austen novels—but is otherwise somewhat somber. Not so with Emma, which is bright and sparkling throughout.

This lightness is in part a result of Austen's decision to fix her protagonist within a higher social stratum than she usually explores. Emma Woodhouse is unique among Austen's heroines in that she is completely secure, financially and socially. Fanny Price of Mansfield Park is totally dependent upon the Bertrams, the wealthy family that takes her in as a small child. Elizabeth Bennet of Pride and Prejudice, for all her brilliance and poise, is the second of five daughters. None have any substantial inheritance, and all face impoverishment if they fail to attract a husband. Emma is free of such pressures. Indeed, she states gaily that she has no intention of marrying at all, as she already has everything she could possibly imagine. And, in a material as well as an emotional sense, she does. So much is clear from the novel's opening paragraph:

Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich,
with a comfortable home and happy disposition,
seemed to unite some of the best blessings of exis-
tence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in
the world with very little to distress or vex her.
(Emma, 3)

-85-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Jane Austen: Pride and Prejudice and Emma
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 4
  • Contents 6
  • Part I - Biography and Reputation 7
  • Introduction 9
  • Chapter 1 - Biography 13
  • Chapter 2 - Reputation 41
  • Part II - The Novels: Pride and Prejudice and Emma 53
  • Introduction 55
  • Chapter L - Pride and Prejudice 59
  • Chapter 2 - Emma. 85
  • Works 104
  • Filmography 105
  • Chronology 107
  • Notes 110
  • Further Information 113
  • Bibliography 119
  • Index 123
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 127

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.