Conversion in the New Testament: Paul and the Twelve

By Richard V. Peace | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THIRTEEN
Process Evangelism: Practice

It is one thing to assert that evangelism needs to take into account the long process by which many people come to faith. It is another actually to do evangelism in this way. We know what evangelism looks like when it is organized around events that seek to produce immediate decisions for Christ. But what does evangelism look like when it is process oriented?

In this final chapter I want to suggest four ways to do process evangelism: small-group evangelism, growth-oriented evangelism, evangelism via the spiritual disciplines, and worship evangelism. This is not meant to be an exhaustive list, but rather an illustrative list of a few of the many ways to do process evangelism. These four methods of outreach are known and used to varying degrees. Certainly worship evangelism is widely used in seeker-sensitive churches. And small-group evangelism is growing in popularity. But in many cases there is not a clear sense of how people come to faith in these contexts. My hope is that the theoretical framework developed in chapter 12 will enrich and enliven these methodologies. Before I describe these four ways of outreach, it is necessary to make a series of general comments that apply to all forms of process evangelism.


An Overview of Process-Evangelism Activities

First, process evangelism will entail great variety simply because people face a host of issues in their spiritual pilgrimages. Event-oriented evangelism can be narrowed down to a rather limited number of activities. But not so with process evangelism, where one must constantly ask: Am I connecting with the

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