The Politics of Vision: Essays on Nineteenth-Century Art and Society

By Linda Nochlin | Go to book overview

Notes
1.
For the letter of January 14, 1898, see Daniel Wildenstein, Claude Monet: Biographie et catalogue raisonné ( Lausanne: La Bibliothèque des Arts, 1979), 3, no. 1399, p. 296. There are several other letters in which Monet expresses his admiration for Zola, in one of which he says, "C'est de l'héroisme absoluement" (to Geffroy, no. 1403, p. 296). He refused, however, to become a member of the Ligue des Droits de I'Homme. See Wildenstein, 3, pp. 82-83, for an analysis of Monet's position.
2.
Cited in Ralph E. Shikes and Paula Harper, Pissarro: His Life and Work ( New York: Horizon Press, 1980), p. 306. For a general account of Pissarro's course of action during the Affair, see ibid., pp. 304-9.
3.
Barbara Ehrlich White, Renoir, His Life, Art, and Letters ( New York: Abrams, 1984), pp. 210-11.
5.
Shikes and Harper, Pissarro: His Life and Work, pp. 307-8. The italic is Pissarro's.
6.
I am excluding from this discussion artists of the second rank, like Forain, or draftsmen like Caran d'Ache, whose work was overtly anti-Semitic on a large scale and who functioned, in effect, as anti-Semitic caricaturists.
7.
Halévy, besides being a popular and highly esteemed dramatic author and novelist, had also served as secretary-editor of the French Legislature, a post he abandoned in 1865 to devote himself exclusively to his literary career. His best-known libretti were written in collaboration with Henri Meilhac and included La Belle Hélène, La Grande- Duchesse de Gérolstein, and La Vie parisienne, all with music by Offenbach. He was awarded the Legion of Honor and was the first Jewish member of the Académie Française. For good accounts of Degas's relation with Halévy, see Roy McMullèn, Degas: His Life, Times, and Work ( Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1984), pp. 369-70, 383-86, 436, 440-41, 460; and Theodore Reff, Degas: The Artist's Mind ( New York: Harper & Row, 1976), pp. 182-88. For a good brief account of Halévy's career, see the Universal Jewish Encyclopedia 1941), 5, pp. 179-80, and La Grande Encyelopédie, 19, pp. 756-57. For a more extended account, see Elain Silvera, Daniel Halévy and His Times: A Gentleman-Commoner in the Third Republic ( Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1966), pp. 1-41, passim.
8.
Ludovic Halévy, like Degas, was born in 1834; both men were therefore forty-five years old at the time the picture was painted.
9.
L. Halévy, "Les Carnets de Ludovic Halévy", Revue des deux mondes 42 ( 1937): 823.
10.
For the importance of the decorations and how they were obtained, see Ludovic Halévy . Carnets, intro. by D. Halévy ( Paris: Calmann-Lévy, 1935), 2, p. 9, August 15, 1869: "I can say that I did not steal it [the Legion of Honor ribbon], for I worked hard for ten years at the Ministry of Algiers and the Colonies and at the Chamber. These were not sinecures!"
11.
For Daniel Halévy, see Silvera, Daniel Halévy and His Times.
12.
For a moving account of this last visit, see Daniel Halévy, My Friend Degas, trans. of Degas parle, trans. M. Curtiss (Middletown, Conn.: Wesleyan University Press, 1964), pp. 104-5.

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The Politics of Vision: Essays on Nineteenth-Century Art and Society
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • Acknowledgments x
  • Introduction xii
  • Notes xxiii
  • 1- The Invention of the Avant-Garde: France, 1830-1880 1
  • Notes 17
  • 2- Courbet, Oller, and a Sense Of Place: the Regional, The Provincial, and the Picturesque In 19th-Century Art 19
  • Notes 32
  • 3- The Imaginary Orient 33
  • Notes 57
  • 4- Camille Pissarro: The Unassuming Eye 60
  • Notes 74
  • 5- Manet's Masked Ball at the Opera 75
  • Notes 92
  • 6- Van Gogh, Renouard, And The Weavers' Crisis in Lyons 95
  • 7- Léon Frédéric And The Stages of a Worker's Life 120
  • Notes 139
  • 8- Degas and the Dreyfus Affair: A Portrait of the Artist As an Anti-Semite. 141
  • Notes 164
  • 9- Seurat's La Grande Jatte: An Anti-Utopian Allegory 170
  • Notes 190
  • Index 194
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