Missions, Nationalism, and the End of Empire

By Alaine Low; Brian Stanley | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2
Missionaries without Empire:
German Protestant Missionary Efforts
in the Interwar Period (1919-1939)

HARTMUT LEHMANN

Before addressing my topic, a few explanatory, or cautionary, remarks seem necessary. First I should like to point out that little research has been done on how German Protestants understood missionary activities after the German Reich had lost all its colonies early on in the First World War. The same is true for the history of German foreign missions between the two world wars.1 Certainly there is a wealth of material, but not much of this has been worked

1. Ernst Damman, "Ausblick: Die deutsche Mission in den ehemaligen deutschen
Kolonien zwischen den Weltkriegen," in Imperialismus und Kolonialmission. Kaiserliches
Deutschland und koloniales Imperium, ed. Klaus J. Bade (Wiesbaden, 1982), pp. 289-305;
Brian Digre, Imperialism's New Clothes: The Repartition of Tropical Africa, 1914-1919 (New
York, 1990); Klaus Fiedler, Christentum und afrikanische Kultur. Konservative deutsche
Missionare in Tanzania 1900-1940 (Gütersloh, 1983); Hans-Werner Gensichen, "German
Protestant Missions," in Missionary Ideologies in the Imperialist Era, 1880-1920, ed. Torben
Christensen and William R. Hutchison (Aarhus, 1982), pp. 181-90; Arno Lehmann, "Der
deutsche Beitrag," in Weltmission in Ökumenischer Zeit, ed. Gerhard Brennecke (Stuttgart,
1961), pp. 153-65; Wm. Roger Louis, Great Britain and Germany's Lost Colonies, 1914-1919
(Oxford, 1967); Richard V. Pierard, "John R. Mott and the Rift in the Ecumenical Move-
ment during World War I," Journal of Ecumenical Studies 23 (1986): 601-19; Pierard, "Allied
Treatment of Protestant Missionaries in German East Africa in World War I," Africa Jour-
nal of Evangelical Theology 12 (1993): 4-17; Pierard, "Shaking the Foundations: World War I,
the Western Allies, and German Protestant Missions," International Bulletin of Missionary
Research (1998): 13-19; Marcia Wright, German Missions to Tanganyika, 1891-1941: Lutherans
and Moravians in the Southern Highlands (Oxford, 1971), chaps. 7–9, pp. 137-207.

-34-

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