The Fall and Sin: What We Have Become as Sinners

By Marguerite Shuster | Go to book overview

Preface

Somehow it seems fitting to be inscribing this preface to a volume on the Fall and sin on Christmas Eve, anticipating the coming of the One who delivers us from their fatal effects and whose final victory we await with longing. True, at the close of the fateful year 2001, the minds of many citizens of the United States are fixed more on their offended innocence in the face of terrorist attacks, than on the overwhelming guilt that marks them as members of a universally fallen humankind. Yet apart from the Fall and the pervasiveness of sin, wars and rumors of wars, cruelty and deceit, suffering and loss, and our final helplessness before all of these, would be all the more baffling. And so, again, we ache for our Savior.

This volume is in its design the third in the series of theology texts begun by Paul King Jewett with God, Creation, and Revelation and Who We Are: Our Dignity as Human. However, ten years have elapsed since Jewett died. He had not begun work on this volume before his death, and hence I have taken responsibility for its content. Surely, it is not in any meaningful sense what it would have been had he written it himself. He did, however, leave transcripts of his lectures and an immense collection of notes and references to research extending over a lifetime. I have consulted all of these and have made much use of them, though I have also, of course, profited from other works published in the last decade. It would be next to impossible to separate out Jewett's work from mine, or to identify where I have diverged from the way he would have wished to state things. Sometimes, I have left sentences or (rarely) even brief

-xi-

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The Fall and Sin: What We Have Become as Sinners
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • Part I - The Fall of Humankind 1
  • I - Introduction: Primal History Viewed as Covenantal 3
  • 2: The Root of the Fall 37
  • 3: The Nature of the Fall 49
  • 4: Consequences of the Fall 62
  • 5: The Divine Purpose and Moral Evil 84
  • Part II - The Doctrine of Sin 97
  • 6: The Nature of Sin 99
  • 7: Sin and Sins 135
  • 8: Original Sin 159
  • 9: Problems of Freedom 182
  • 10: Civil Righteousness 212
  • Appendix I - Physical Death as Existential Reality 230
  • Appendix 2 - Biblical Vocabulary Relating to Sin 263
  • Subject Index 266
  • Name Index 271
  • Scripture Reference Index 275
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