China Marches West: The Qing Conquest of Central Eurasia

By Peter C. Perdue | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This study has taken far too long for me to be able to thank adequately everyone who has contributed to it. Joseph Fletcher, with whom I studied Manchu at Harvard, died in 1984 while I was in the archives in Beijing completing my first book and exploring a new topic on northwest China. I and many others have tried to carry on the work that he so heroically pioneered. I received valuable help from the staff at the Number One Archives in Beijing, the Palace Archives in Taiwan, the Archive of Foreign Policy, and the State Archive of Ancient Acts in Moscow. Galina Khartulary and Valerii Klokov were invaluable guides to the mysteries of Moscow. In Beijing, I would like to single out Cheng Chongde, Director of the People's University Qing History Institute, and his colleagues, and Li Bozhong, an old friend and colleague, among many others. Back home, I am especially grateful to Dean Philip Khoury for his constant support, and to all my colleagues on the MIT History Faculty for comments and encouragement. Anne McCants, Pauline Maier, Harriet Ritvo, and Elizabeth Wood offered especially valuable reactions to an early chapter. John Dower has been a constant source of sagely wisdom. I could make progress on this book even while serving as department head only because of their goodwill and dedication. Many parts of this text have been presented at seminars at the Fairbank Center for East Asian Studies at Harvard University, Columbia University, the University of California, Irvine, the California Institute of Technology, the Institute for Agrarian Studies at Yale University, the University of Kansas, and annual meetings of the Association of Asian Studies, the American Historical Association, and seminars as far-flung as Istanbul, Taibei, Beijing, and Japan. I greatly appreciate all the helpful reactions re-

-xvii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
China Marches West: The Qing Conquest of Central Eurasia
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 725

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.