China Marches West: The Qing Conquest of Central Eurasia

By Peter C. Perdue | Go to book overview

Note on Names, Dates, Weights and
Measures, and Chinese Characters

Names

Achieving consistency in the romanization of personal and place-names has caused me constant headaches. I have tried wherever possible to write each person's name in the romanized version of the language of his primary ethnic group. Alternative romanizations are given in parentheses, preceded by an indication of the language (Ma. for Manchu, Mo. for Mongolian, Ch. for Chinese, and T. for Tibetan). For Chinese names, I use pinyin romanization; for Manchu names, the spelling used in Jerry Norman, A Concise Manchu-English Lexicon (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1978). Russian names generally follow the Library of Congress system. Mongolian names come in many flavors, reflecting differences of dialects and different romanization systems. Foolish consistency being impossible, I have used spellings that, I hope, will be at least pronounceable by those unfamiliar with the subtleties of Altaic languages, and at least recognizable by those who care about philological accuracy. For Tibetan, I give a pronounceable version following R. A. Stein, Tibetan Civilization (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1972), with the original spelling in parentheses. Turkic names and places usually follow James A. Millward, Beyond the Pass: Economy, Ethnicity, and Empire in Qing Central Asia, 1759–1864 (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1998). See Appendix A for the names and reign years of the major Central Eurasian rulers discussed here.

I use different romanizations to distinguish Soochow, the great textile city of the lower Yangzi, from Suzhou, the garrison town in western Gansu.

-xix-

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