China Marches West: The Qing Conquest of Central Eurasia

By Peter C. Perdue | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1. The term "Great Game" usually refers to the geopolitical rivalry over Central Eurasia between the British and Russian empires in the nineteenth century. Rudyard Kipling used it in his novel Kim, published in 1901. For recent studies, see Peter Hopkirk, The Great Game: The Struggle for Empire in Central Asia (New York: Kodansha, 1992); Karl E. Meyer and Shareen Blair Brysac, Tournament of Shadows: The Great Game and the Race for Empire in Central Asia (Washington, D.C.: Counterpoint, 1999).
2. Rein Taagepera lists the Russian and Qing empires as third and fifth among the twenty largest empires in world history, rivaled only by the British, Mongol, and French. Rein Taagepera, "Size and Duration of Empire: Systematics of Size," Social Science Research 7 (1978), p. 126.
3. 5, Outer Mongolia proclaimed its independence in 1911 but became a Soviet satellite under Red Army occupation in 1921.
4. For an only partially adequate narrative of these events, based primarily on Russian sources, see Fred W. Bergholz, The Partition of the Steppe: The Straggle of the Russians, Manchus, and the Zunghar Mongols for Empire in Central Asia, 1619–1758: A Study in Power Politics (New York: Peter Lang, 1993). Reviews by Elizabeth Endicott-West in Journal of Asian Studies 53, no. 2 (May 1994), pp. 527–528, and Robert Montgomery in Mongolian Studies 17(1994), pp. 105–118. Morris Rossabi, China and Inner Asia: From 1368 to the Present Day (New York: Pica Press, 1975), contains a brief discussion, as does Thomas |. Barfield, The Perilous Frontier: Nomadic Empires and China (Cambridge, Mass.: Basil Blackwell, 1989), pp. 266–296.
5. Denis Sinor, Introduction à I' Étude de I'Asie Centrale (Wiesbaden: O. Harrassowitz, 1963).
6. Luc Kwanten, Imperial Nomads (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1979).

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