9
“QUEEN OF KINGS”:
CLEOPATRA THEA NEOTERA

The Ptolemies showcased their elite women in their art. Ptolemaic queens were regularly represented on the official coinage and in portraiture, usually paired with their husbands. R. R. R. Smith speculates that their prominence made them likely models for Hellenistic portraiture of women in the East, both royal and non-royal women alike. The Ptolemaic queens were portrayed in a highly idealized style with broad cranium and narrow delicate chins, unlined faces, rounded lips, and almond-shaped eyes. Their hair was waved or more often arranged in a series of overlapping sections that resemble the outside of a melon; this was designated the “melon hairstyle” (melonenfrisur) by German scholars.

It was thus very much in the natural course of things that numismatic and statuary portraits of Cleopatra were commissioned. The commencement of Cleopatra's co-regency with Ptolemy XIII, when she was around 20, marked the official debut of her public imagery. Just as the portraiture of Auletes and the other Ptolemies was based on that of the dynasty's founder, Ptolemy I Soter, so too was that of Ptolemy XIII. Cleopatra's portraits were similarly rooted in prototypical images of Egypt's earlier Ptolemaic queens and princesses—the many Arsinoes, Berenices, and Cleopatras.

The accident of Cleopatra's birth had placed her at the center of power and was something to be relished and capitalized upon. There is every indication that she maximized her opportunities and did so with grandeur

-135-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cleopatra and Rome
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Prologue: From Carpet to Asp 1
  • 1: Cleopatra Superstar 16
  • 2: The Major Players 29
  • 3: The Supporting Cast 45
  • 4: The Professionals 58
  • 5: Cleopatra Architecta 68
  • 6: Alexandria on the Tiber 93
  • 7: Living the Inimitable Life 102
  • 8: Ersatz Alexanders in Egypt and Rome 119
  • 9: [Queen of Kings]: Cleopatra Thea Neotera 135
  • 10: Even Death Won't Part Us Now 157
  • 11: Egyptomania! 163
  • 12: Divine Alter Egos 179
  • 13: A Roman Pharaoh and a Roman Emperor 189
  • 14: Rome on the Tiber 200
  • 15: Death, Dynasty, and a Roman Dendera 219
  • 16: Competing with Cleopatra on Coins 230
  • 17: Princesses and Power Hair 242
  • 18: Regina Romana 251
  • 19: From Asp to Eternity 261
  • Notes 285
  • Bibliography 289
  • Illustration Credits 315
  • Acknowledgments 321
  • Index 325
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 340

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.