Chapter 5
Commerce, Civilisation, War, and
the Highlands

Rob Roy and A Legend of the Wars of Montrose

Guy Mannering, the military commander, represents one part of the machinery of empire, which secured by force the routes through which people, material goods, and ideas moved across established boundaries. The machinery was powered by the City of London, and by the new commercial and financial institutions that motivated and financed the development of trading interests overseas. As we have seen, in Waverley Scott tended to divorce cultural modernisation from the commercial interests and activities that promoted it. In Guy Mannering the hero's attempt to maintain his distance from the commercial interests he serves is rendered problematic at various points in the narrative. In Rob Roy, however, the relationship between polite culture and commercial interests is considered more directly, and the problem of maintaining the hero's distance from commerce is negotiated through a first-person narrative.

Scott's treatment of this subject can be approached by thinking about the more recent views of the political and cultural consequences of commerce. In our own age the accelerating process of globalisation, coupled with the rapid demise of a number of totalitarian regimes, has inspired optimistic visions of the liberating potential of capitalism. Francis Fukuyama, for example, proclaims the victory of capitalism as 'the world's only viable economic system' and predicts that 'liberal democracy' may constitute the 'end point of mankind's ideological development'.1 George Herbert Bush's vision of a 'New World Order' that could realise 'the universal aspirations of mankind' and establish global 'peace and security, freedom and the rule of law' is implicitly underpinned by a comparable faith in the liberating potential of capitalism.2 On the other hand, many critics have emphasised the dispossessions, inequalities, and cultural destruction associated with the rise of global capitalism, while some have addressed the question of how the optimists reconcile themselves to such negative consequences. Pierre Bourdieu finds an answer in

-121-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Walter Scott and Modernity
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - Towards the Modern Nation 30
  • Chapter 3 - The Condition of England 67
  • Chapter 4 - Western Identities and the Orient 89
  • Chapter 5 - Commerce, Civilisation, War, and the Highlands 121
  • Chapter 6 - Liberal Dilemmas: Scott and Covenanting Tradition 151
  • Chapter 7 - Liberal Dilemmas: Liberty or Alienation? 188
  • Chapter 8 - Postscript 218
  • Bibliography 222
  • Index 244
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 254

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.