Roosevelt the Reformer: Theodore Roosevelt as Civil Service Commissioner, 1889-1895

By Richard D. White Jr. | Go to book overview

7
1895
Returning to New York

THEODORE ROOSEVELT ENJOYED walking from his rented house on Nineteenth Street to his City Hall office at Judiciary Square. At Roosevelt's brisk pace, the jaunt took about thirty minutes. The walk was exhilarating, as the nation's capital was among America's most beautiful and cleanest cities. Unlike the dingy metropolises of Philadelphia, Boston, and New York, Washington endured little factory smoke to mar the sides of the white sandstone government buildings, nor did it suffer the rows of squalid tenements filled with immigrants. No skyscrapers blocked the sun or competed with the Washington Monument, recently completed and no longer resembling, according to Mark Twain, a "factory chimney with the top broken off."1 Once-unsightly wires for electric light and telephones had been buried underground.2 The scene of only ten murders in 1895, Washington ranked among the nation's safest cities.3

Roosevelt's walks took two general courses. If he chose the more northerly route, he followed tree-lined Massachusetts Avenue, which cut a diagonal swath across other streets to form quaint little parks and circles and passed by some of Washington's most ornate mansions and foreign embassies. If Theodore veered south, he strolled beneath the noble beech trees of Lafayette Park, where pigeons strutted among children playing hopscotch and nursemaids gossiped nearby. In the center of the square he could glance up at an equestrian statue of General Jackson, "as archaic as a Ninevite king, prancing and rocking through the ages."4 During the springtime he passed straw-hatted men basking on the park's benches reading their newspapers, either the morning's

-141-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Roosevelt the Reformer: Theodore Roosevelt as Civil Service Commissioner, 1889-1895
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Roosevelt the Reformer ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: 1889 Arriving in Washington 7
  • 2: 1890 Attacked from All Quarters 35
  • 3: 1891 Building Valuable Friendships 54
  • 4: 1892 Making Progress in Civil Service Reform 79
  • 5: 1893 Reappointment by the Democrats 97
  • 6: 1894 Building the Merit System 119
  • 7: 1895 Returning to New York 141
  • 8: 1901 Continuing Reform as President 160
  • Epilogue - 1916 Rapprochement 184
  • Appendix 189
  • Notes on Sources 203
  • Notes 207
  • Bibliography 241
  • Acknowledgments 253
  • Index 255
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 264

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.