Roosevelt the Reformer: Theodore Roosevelt as Civil Service Commissioner, 1889-1895

By Richard D. White Jr. | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

THE ASSISTANCE provided by Wallace Dailey, the curator of the Theodore Roosevelt Collection at Harvard, was essential and greatly appreciated. William Andrew, a doctoral student at Virginia Polytechnic Institute, researched the National Civil Service Reform League Archives files and kindly provided his notes. Victoria Kalamaris, a National Park Service curator at Sagamore Hill, was quite helpful in guiding me through the records and providing a unique glimpse into how the Roosevelts lived during the 1890s. Penny McMillan provided a fascinating tour of Bulloch Hall, the childhood home of Roosevelt's mother, Mittie Bulloch, which is located near Atlanta, Georgia.

A number of scholars lent valuable assistance and advice to this research project. Professor Paul Van Riper of Texas A&M, the premier historian of the American civil service, kindly reviewed the manuscript. Nathan Miller, a noted Roosevelt biographer, also provided valuable guidance. Jim Richardson, Dan Marin, and Lamar Jones of Louisiana State University, Lanny Keller of Baton Rouge, Jim Bowman of Florida State, and Jeremy Plant of Penn State made important contributions. The LSU Council of Research provided two summer research grants to help complete this book.

This project could not have been completed without the outstanding support and guidance of the staff of the University of Alabama Press.

-253-

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Roosevelt the Reformer: Theodore Roosevelt as Civil Service Commissioner, 1889-1895
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Roosevelt the Reformer ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: 1889 Arriving in Washington 7
  • 2: 1890 Attacked from All Quarters 35
  • 3: 1891 Building Valuable Friendships 54
  • 4: 1892 Making Progress in Civil Service Reform 79
  • 5: 1893 Reappointment by the Democrats 97
  • 6: 1894 Building the Merit System 119
  • 7: 1895 Returning to New York 141
  • 8: 1901 Continuing Reform as President 160
  • Epilogue - 1916 Rapprochement 184
  • Appendix 189
  • Notes on Sources 203
  • Notes 207
  • Bibliography 241
  • Acknowledgments 253
  • Index 255
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