Brazil Imagined: 1500 To the Present

By Darlene J. Sadlier | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 1

Edenic and Cannibal Encounters

When the Portuguese nobleman Pedro Álvares Cabral and his armada of thirteen ships left Lisbon on March 9,1500, his mission was to sail to the port city of Calicut in India and bring back spices, silks, porcelains, and other valuable commodities.1 Vasco da Gama had opened the sea route to India two years earlier, and the Portuguese monarch, Dom Manuel I, was eager to send a much larger expedition to keep Portugal in the forefront of maritime trade with the East.2 Onboard Cabral's ship was the royally appointed fInancial administrator from Oporto, Pero Vaz de Caminha, who was attached to Cabral's ship as scribe. It was on that trip that Caminha wrote his famous letter of May 1, 1500, to Dom Manuel, in which he describes the founding of a land that eventually would be called Brazil.

There are difFerent hypotheses about why Cabral sailed so far west of Vasco da Gama's Atlantic route to India that he ultimately sighted Brazil. In his Tratado da terra do Brasil (Treatise on the Land of Brazil), written in 1574, the Portuguese chronicler Pero de Magalhães Gândavo attributes the fleet's southwesterly turn to doldrums that forced Cabral to seek better sailing winds far of the Guinea coast. This course took his armada directly west to Porto Seguro and the coastline of what is today Bahia. According to Brazilian cultural historian Luís da Câmara Cascudo, for a long time the discovery of Brazil was attributed to a storm that caused Cabral to change direction and head south-southwest. But neither Caminha's letter nor nautical charts of the period refer to any inclement weather that might have driven Cabral of course.3

Portuguese literary historian Jaime Cortesão argues that imperialism, and not nature, was the real reason for Cabral's westerly turn. He contends that with the Spanish already in North America and with the redrawing of the Line of Tordesillas in 1494 to a more favorable position for Portuguese expansion (370 leagues west of the Cape Verde Islands), Cabral's imagination was fueled by the possibility of new Atlantic conquests (Cortesão 1967, 90–91). The German-born medievalist scholar Carolina Michaëlis de Vas-

-9-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Brazil Imagined: 1500 To the Present
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Edenic and Cannibal Encounters 9
  • Chapter 2: Paradise (Re)Gained - Dutch Representations of Brazil and Nativist Imagery 63
  • Chapter 3 - Regal Brazil 106
  • Chapter 4 - The Foundations of a National Literary Imaginary 132
  • Chapter 5 - Modernist Brazil 184
  • Chapter 6 - Good Neighbor Brazil 209
  • Chapter 7 - From Revolutionary to Dystopian Brazil on Screen 234
  • Epilogue - Land of the Future 274
  • Notes 299
  • Bibliography 335
  • Index 355
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 380

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.