Lines in the Sand: Congressional Redistricting in Texas and the Downfall of Tom Delay

By Steve Bickerstaff | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 19
Conclusion

The events of 2001–2003 in Texas make up an amazing tale that continues to have a significant effect on national and state politics. I have tried to present those events in a straightforward and nonpolitical manner. Ultimately, however, I think the story is a tragedy. It is tragic not because one side won or lost, but because it illustrates the misplaced priorities of our government officials and institutions at a time when the future of this country demands more.

One reason why the events are tragic is obvious. They show national and state officials losing sight of the needs of Texans while focusing on the misbegotten priority of partisan dominance. Like most states, Texas in 2003 was struggling with many serious state issues, including an increasingly inadequate public school system and a serious shortfall in available revenues. The editorial board of the Houston Chronicle was correct in February 2003 when, on hearing about the possibility of redistricting, it observed: "At a time when Texas is grasping for pennies to immunize Texas children, legislators don't need to waste resources giving booster shots to political power plays."

The outlay of energy by the partisan participants in 2003 was enormous. Politicians of both parties put aside other personal and state affairs in favor of warring over an unnecessary redistricting. For lawmakers who seldom have time to focus intently on a single subject for a few hours, much less for days, it was extraordinary for eleven Democratic senators to encamp themselves together for forty days in a hotel over a thousand miles from the Texas Capitol because of partisan rancor. For most of that time, Republican senators remained gathered in Austin, restricted to their offices and apartments and seething with a similar rancor, while Republican congressmen shuttled in and out of the city lobbying for partisan district lines. Altogether the state officials and lawmakers spent almost 140 days (June–October) plotting and fretting almost solely about congressional redistricting. The personal sacrifice by these

-379-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Lines in the Sand: Congressional Redistricting in Texas and the Downfall of Tom Delay
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 472

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.