Spanish American Poetry at the End of the Twentieth Century: Textual Disruptions

By Jill S. Kuhnheim | Go to book overview

acknowledgements

I am grateful to many people for their contributions to this project, since the development of ideas depends on exchange. Taking part in these conversations were colleagues at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, especially Guido Podestá, Juan Egea, and Rubén Medina, and at the University of Kansas: Danny Anderson, Vicky Unruh, Michael Doudoroff, and Andy Debicki. I was also able to test my ideas in graduate seminars at both U.W.-Madison and K.U., and I thank my students in these classes for their lively engagement with the materials and creative responses to what we read, which frequently stimulated my thinking. Other colleagues who have exchanged ideas, read drafts, and shared their literary and cultural insights are Linda J. Krumholz (my most faithful reader), José CernaBazán, Marcia Stephenson, and Jacobo Sefamí. Friends and colleagues who deserve thanks for their more general support of my work on this project are Gwen Kirkpatrick, Roberta Johnson, Brad Epps, Mihai Grunfeld, and Elena Castro. The University of Kansas has provided necessary institutional assistance in the form of a semester's leave complemented by a Hall Center for the Humanities Research Fellowship; I would not have been able to complete the book without this time away from other responsibilities. Many of the artists have also been generous, sharing their work and corresponding or meeting with me, and 1 am indebted to them for their collaboration: Carmen Berenguer, Luis Bravo, Luis Camnitzer, José CernaBazán, Eduardo Espina, Clemente Riedemann, Cecilia Vicuña, and Raúl Zurita. The writing of this book would have been possible but not nearly as much fun without the encouragement and inspiration of my partner, Theresa Shireman.

All translations are my own unless otherwise noted. Part of Chapter 1 originally appeared in Pablo Neruda and the U.S. Culture Industry, edited by Teresa Longo (2002), and I am grateful to Routledge Press for permission to reprint that section. Part of Chapter 2 appeared in Siglo XX/Twentieth Century: Critique and Cultural Discourse (1996), and a section of Chapter 3 appeared in Romance Language Annual 11 (2000); I am grateful to these

-ix-

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Spanish American Poetry at the End of the Twentieth Century: Textual Disruptions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction - Textual Disruptions 1
  • 1: Toward a Postmodern Indigenismo 14
  • 2: Image and Text 47
  • 3: Recycling Urban Poetry Al Fin Del Siglo 82
  • 4: Sensual Excess 115
  • 5: Poetry and Technology 145
  • Epilogue - [As I Advance the Water Changes] 170
  • Notes 173
  • Works Cited 189
  • Index 201
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