Spanish American Poetry at the End of the Twentieth Century: Textual Disruptions

By Jill S. Kuhnheim | Go to book overview

4
Sensual Excess

THE NEOBAROQUE

On the edge of the twenty-first century, looking back at the last, we understand that an array of cultural changes have affected how poetry is both produced and consumed. In Chapter r, we considered how indigenist discourse in poetry can be employed both in collusion with and in confrontation to Western cultural expectations. Chapter 2 examined works that redefine conventional relations between visual and written images, and Chapter 3 looked at how urban expansion, linked to ideas of development and modernity, has altered poetic practices. We found poems that took new paths, questioning concepts of nationality and economic success and altering lyric subjectivity to reveal other perspectives. One constant in the backdrop to these poetic shifts has been the changing role of poetry itself. Due to the increased importance and distribution of mass media, poetry is no longer just opposed to narrative, as it was at the earlytwentieth-century advent of the cheap book, which marked the “industrialization of language” that “accentuated the minority status of the poem,” as George Steiner has expressed it (42). Now, in the age of spectacle (Guy Debord's term), both poetry and prose compete with visual images, computer screens, and a myriad of associated multimedia discourses that produce different kinds of readings and distinct perceptions. Popular films have an often-slippery relationship to their makers' construction of images, for visual images have a reality effect that may obscure their means of production. Computer texts call for still another, faster mode of reading in which the object is not to linger with the word but to glide over it or to use it as a link to other, hypertexrual channels. Music, particularly rap, underscores rhythmic manifestations of language in patterns that can be called “poetic,” but it, by definition, lacks poetry's graphic element, the combination of sound with the sight of words on a page. Considering just a few of these changes in the cultural field in which poetry dons the jersey of the underdog makes the jarring difference of the neobaroqué quite clear.

-115-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Spanish American Poetry at the End of the Twentieth Century: Textual Disruptions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction - Textual Disruptions 1
  • 1: Toward a Postmodern Indigenismo 14
  • 2: Image and Text 47
  • 3: Recycling Urban Poetry Al Fin Del Siglo 82
  • 4: Sensual Excess 115
  • 5: Poetry and Technology 145
  • Epilogue - [As I Advance the Water Changes] 170
  • Notes 173
  • Works Cited 189
  • Index 201
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 216

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.