Spanish American Poetry at the End of the Twentieth Century: Textual Disruptions

By Jill S. Kuhnheim | Go to book overview

5
Poetry and Technology

Throughout this study we have seen how poetry interacts with other genres, discourses, and cultural forms in ways that have called for an interdisciplinary approach to our thinking about the lyric in late-twentieth-century Spanish America. Through particular examples from a range of authors, we have seen how poetry can integrate visual images to different ends and how visual art can incorporate the written word and poetic techniques. We have uncovered how certain themes and styles, such as indigenismo, urban existence, or the neobaroque, provide continuity with past literary and cultural phenomena even as they transform these—at times offering radically new perspectives on tradition and at other times recycling leftovers from the past into a “fresh” recipe. Uniting these authors and their works has created a subtext of interconnections, for in almost every case they defy categorization; for example, Vicuña's work could be part of postmodern indigenismo as well as the chapter on written and visual images, and much of Tulio Mora's poetry can also be read in terms of the city. Many of the authors' works already considered here also demonstrate the effects of one of the principal changes to mark this time period—the explosion of the mass media and of technology. This chapter's focal point, then, provides another point of refraction off the previous chapters' contents, illuminating how aspects of postmodern mediatized cultures mingle with the lyric in a variety of formats: electronic, filmic, and textual.

Contemplating the “uncertain future of the printed word” in an essay with that subtitle, Jean Franco observes that the end of the twentieth century has brought with it the end of a Utopian vision of the future in Latin America. While this vision has taken distinct forms throughout the years, Franco notes how it was sustained largely by the print culture of Latin America's intelligentsia—a culture and a group whose consequence she finds waning: “Everywhere in contemporary Latin America there is a sense of the literary intelligentsia's diminished importance and displacement from public discourse” (17). Some of this decrease has to do with the

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Spanish American Poetry at the End of the Twentieth Century: Textual Disruptions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction - Textual Disruptions 1
  • 1: Toward a Postmodern Indigenismo 14
  • 2: Image and Text 47
  • 3: Recycling Urban Poetry Al Fin Del Siglo 82
  • 4: Sensual Excess 115
  • 5: Poetry and Technology 145
  • Epilogue - [As I Advance the Water Changes] 170
  • Notes 173
  • Works Cited 189
  • Index 201
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