Spanish American Poetry at the End of the Twentieth Century: Textual Disruptions

By Jill S. Kuhnheim | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION. TEXTUAL DISRUPTIONS

1. This last idea comes from Juan Egea's insightful oral presentation on lyric techniques in Spanish cinema, “Lyric or Film: Reflections on Spanish Lyric Cinema”

2. I use the terms “modemismo” and “modernista” in Spanish throughout the text to distinguish between the Spanish American periods or movements and “modernist” and “modernism” in European and North American contexts. Seejrade for a discussion of the origins of the term “modemismo” (14). Her book and those by Julio Ramos (Desencuentros de la modernidad en America Latina: Literatura y politico en el sigh XIX. Mexico City: Fondo de Cultura Económica, 1989) and Gerard Aching (The Politics of Spanish American Modemismo: By Exquisite Design. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1997) are among the most intriguing of recent rereadings of modemismo.

3. Modemismo, as constructed by literary historians, has been dominated by the poetic, but prose—particularly fiction and chronicles—was also fundamental to the movement and was often much more explicitly engaged with the social. Reading the prose works suggests that modernista poets had more than aesthetic concerns in mind even as they assembled an alternative perspective in their poetry.

4. By “textualize,” I mean that they did not seek to mimetically represent or make reference to the crisis, but to make the crisis palpable, to make it happen in the text. I use the term “textualize” throughout this book as a way to describe how experience can be translated and transformed into language.

5. I use the term “Latin America” here with some self-consciousness of its artificiality. Throughout this study we will encounter social and historical circumstances and the cultural responses to these that join the different nations of the region. However, as Walter Mignolo reminds us, “Latin America” in the early twentieth century was a term largely used outside the region—inside, the preferred denomination was “America” (“Editor's Introduction,” 506). The term also usually includes Brazil, which is outside the scope of this study. “Latin America” may also create the impression of a fixed regional identity, when we are really talking about a complex set of national identities that are in process, changing and evolving relative to historical and social circumstances—a situation that may not be evident in this static label but should become clear in the course of my cultural investigations.

6. In their “Introduction” to Postmodernidad en la periferia, Herlinghaus and Walter cite Fernando Calderón's observation that “development,” “dependency”

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Spanish American Poetry at the End of the Twentieth Century: Textual Disruptions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction - Textual Disruptions 1
  • 1: Toward a Postmodern Indigenismo 14
  • 2: Image and Text 47
  • 3: Recycling Urban Poetry Al Fin Del Siglo 82
  • 4: Sensual Excess 115
  • 5: Poetry and Technology 145
  • Epilogue - [As I Advance the Water Changes] 170
  • Notes 173
  • Works Cited 189
  • Index 201
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