Methods in Medical Ethics

By Jeremy Sugarman; Daniel P. Sulmasy | Go to book overview

Preface

Medical ethics has now become a field of scholarly inquiry that uses a wide variety of methods. These methods derive from the humanities and the social sciences, including anthropology, economics, epidemiology, health services research, history, law, medicine, nursing, philosophy, psychology, sociology, and theology. Although multiple publications examine how problems in medical ethics might be understood within the context of one or more disciplines, we were unable to identify any book that systematically examined all of these disciplines and their multiple methods of inquiry across the entire broad field of medical ethics. Given the multidisciplinary nature of medical ethics, such an examination seems wanting.

Our interest in this area began during our work as fellows in internal medicine at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and as graduate students in philosophy at Georgetown University. Our intensive training in both empirical research methods and philosophy made it clear to us that doing quality work in medical ethics requires immersion in one or more of the disciplines that contribute to the field. Moreover, sound training in different disciplines helps make interdisciplinary work productive, relevant, and exciting.

While we had direct experience doing work that involved several disciplines, we were interested in learning more about the ways that other disciplines with which we were less familiar addressed questions in medical ethics. To this end, in the spring of 1994 we conducted a workshop, “Approaching Research Questions in Medical Ethics from Multiple Disciplines,” at the annual meeting of the Society of General Internal Medicine in Washington, D.C. We were fortunate to have noted scholars join us in this workshop: Tom Beauchamp, Ph.D. (philosophy); Gregg Bloche, M.D., J.D. (law); Barbara Koenig, Ph.D. (ethnography); Barron Lerner, M.D., Ph.D. (history); Robert Pearlman, M.D. (empirical research); and Edmund Pellegrino, M.D. (clinical ethics). The workshop confirmed our impression that having an accurate grasp of the methods employed in addressing a particular question in medical ethics is essential, not only for engaging in scholarly inquiry, but also for understanding the work that results from it.

Through these and related experiences, we became convinced that a book that examined the many methods of medical ethics would serve as a valuable resource to scholars, teachers, editors, students, and others interested in medical ethics. However, in beginning this project, we struggled with questions about which methods to include. In the end, we settled on approaches that have arguably played a significant role in the contemporary field of medical ethics. Proceeding roughly from normative to descriptive approaches, these are: philosophy; religion and theology; professional codes; law; casuistry; history; qualitative research; ethnography; quantitative surveys; experimental methods; and economics and decision science.

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Methods in Medical Ethics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Contributors xiii
  • Part I - Overview 1
  • 1: The Many Methods of Medical Ethics (Or, Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird) 3
  • 2: A Decade of Empirical Research in Medical Ethics 19
  • Part II - Methods 29
  • 3: Philosophy 31
  • 4: Religion and Theology 47
  • 5: Professional Codes 70
  • 6: Legal Methods 88
  • 7: Casuistry 104
  • 8: History 126
  • 9: Qualitative Methods 146
  • 10: Ethnographic Methods 169
  • 11: Quantitative Surveys 1 192
  • 12: Experimental Methods 207
  • 13: Economics and Decision Science 227
  • Part III - Relationships and Applications 245
  • 14: Research in Medical Ethics: Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia 247
  • 15: Research in Medical Ethics: Genetic Diagnosis 1 267
  • 16: Reading the Medical Ethics Literature: a Discourse on Method 286
  • Index 298
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 314

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.