Shaping the Moral Life: An Approach to Moral Theology

By Klaus Demmer; James E. Keenan et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ONE
CATHOLIC MORAL THEOLOGY:
ITS FORM AND CHALLENGES

The Cultural Context

Catholic moral theology has always been a child of its time, and this situation holds true for the present as well. One could compare it to a seismograph of the ever-changing Zeitgeist, trying to reckon and deal with the many problems that affect people's lives. It would not be an exaggeration to say that moral theology must bear the first impact of new issues; our contemporaries expect from the moral theologian an answer to a profound and acute question: How is it possible to translate Christian faith into moral action in a secularized and pluralistic world, without being intellectually dishonest?

Clearly, moral theology faces a very challenging agenda—which raises another question: What form (Gestalt) should moral theology have, and how does this form relate to the challenges the discipline faces? Some suggestions are needed to find an orientation without losing it in a tangle of issues and approaches. No other theological discipline requires such a demanding synthesis of human sensitivity and culture.

Moral theologians work within a long tradition, yet they also work at a specific time in that tradition. On one hand, they must keep a healthy distance from the object of their reflection so they do not force themselves on their interlocutors; on the other hand, they cannot avoid personal engagement. Moral theology inevitably contains a biographical element that reflects the personality of theologians and their particular life story; through this element, moral theologians convey their proximity to life. Moral theology is anything but a

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Shaping the Moral Life: An Approach to Moral Theology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 104

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.