The Story of Bioethics: From Seminal Works to Contemporary Explorations

By Eran P. Iuein; Jennifer K. Walter | Go to book overview

PREFACE

ERAN P. KLEIN AND JENNIFER K. WALTER

If critical self-reflection is a mark of maturity, bioetliics as a field seems to be coming of age. As Albert R. Jonsen notes in his recent history, bioetliics-while not emerging de novo-\\us only “born” as a disti~ict discipline over tlic last several decades (Jonsen 1998). Set against tlic long 1iisto1-y of pliilosopliy and tlieologp proper (out of \\rliicli, arguably, bioetliics arose), bioetliics as a field is indeed young. Yet the diversity and depth of ideas tliat li;i\le emerged during its short lifetime are impressive. The rapid social changes wrought 191 modern niedicine have rccluircd tliat bioetliics be precocious beyond its years. Unlike fields witli longer histories, the accelerated development of bioetliics lias left little time for reflection on the shape of the field itself. This is beginning to change.

In recent years, interest in bioetliics as a field lias largely come from two directions. Tlie first lias been a liistorical interest in the origins of bioethics-tlic events, people, social nio\leiiients, and technological advancements present at the start of the field. Tlie second has been an interest in tlie purpose and potential of bioethics as a field-What role can or should national comniissions play? What are bioetliics programs training people for? Arc there bioetliics “experts”? How diverse is hioetliics in terms of race, class, religion, and ideology? Put simply, tliere are two cluestions tliat motivate interest in bioetliics as a field: From wlicrc did bioetliics collie and liere re is it going?

The essays collccted in this volume are premised on the notion tliat these two threads are interwoven: one cannot understand wlicrc bioctliics is going as a field \vitliout understanding liow it arrived where it is today, nor can one talk intelligibly about the 1iisto1-y of bioetliics \vitliout a sense of how it understands itself today and projects itself into tlie fiiture. This volume finds seminal works in bioetliics to be a particularly iisef~ilr esource for exploring tlie connection between tlie past and filture of tlic field. Insofir as seminal works have had a role in establisliing the field of bioetliics, they have historical importance. Insofar as they continue to shape the nature and scope of debate in conteniporanr bioetliics, they arc inextricably bound witli its fi~ture.S eniinal works provide a uniclue window, into understanding the field of bioetliics.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Story of Bioethics: From Seminal Works to Contemporary Explorations
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 248

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.