Journal of a Lady of Quality

By Janet Schaw; Evangeline Walker Andrews | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I
The Voyage to the West Indies

Burnt Island Road* on board the Jamaica Packet
9 o'Clock Evening 25th Octr 1774.

WE are now got on Board, heartily fatigued, yet not likely to sleep very sound in our new apartments, which I am afraid will not prove either very agreeable or commodious; nor, from what I can see, will our Ship be an exception to the reflections thrown on Scotch Vessels in general, as indeed, nothing can be less cleanly than our Cabin, unless it be its Commander, and his friend and bedfellow the Supercargo. I hinted to the Captain that I thought our Cabin rather dirty. He assured me every Vessel was so 'till they got out to Sea, but that as soon as we were under way, he wou'd stow away the things that were lumbering about, and then all wou'd be neat during the Voyage. I appear to believe him; it were in vain to dispute; here we are, and here we must be for sometime. My brotfier has laid

* Burntisland is a seaport of county Fife, on the north side of the Firth
of Forth, five miles across from Leith and Edinburgh. As there was a ferry
from Leith, it is quite probable that Miss Schaw and her party drove to
Leith in carriages and there boarded the ferryboat for Burntisland. The
seaport has an excellent harbour and was a favorite anchorage for vessels
entering or leaving the firth, but the fact that the owner of the vessel lived
at Burntisland may furnish an additional reason for the place of departure.
Some of the Scottish regiments serving in the Revolutionary War sailed
from this port, and as early as 1627 we meet with a vessel called the
Blessing of Burntisland.

-19-

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Journal of a Lady of Quality
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction to the Bison Books Edition v
  • Contents xv
  • Illustrations xvi
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter I - The Voyage to the West Indies 19
  • Chapter II - Antigua and St. Christopher 78
  • Chapter III - Residence in North Carolina 144
  • Chapter IV - Sojourn in Lisbon 216
  • Appendices 255
  • Index 335
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