Gay Fiction Speaks: Conversations with Gay Novelists

By Richard Canning | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

Richard Canning’s interviews may help change the way we regard the genre, which is often relegated to a place somewhere between journalism and public relations. In a culture I “that elevates individualism, formal completeness, and reproducibility, the interview’s collaborative, improvisational nature is understandably (but unfortunately) underappreciated. Yet in Richard Canning’s hands—or, more literally, through his microphone—the interview is raised to a high art, a kind of conversational jazz, that drove me to read on for hours, caught up in the drama of his dialogues.

Early on, Canning made two interrelated decisions that facilitated his task and won him the trust of authors who are usually rather guarded. First, he avoids personal questions; second, he wants to know about the artistic decisions that inform these writers’ works. In short, he takes his interviewees seriously as artists. Such an approach is surprisingly rare, especially with gay writers. At least it’s been my experience that interviewers, if they acknowledge that I am gay, are more interested in exploring my personal life than my artistry. The work seems secondary. One of the ways that gay authors have been ghettoized is by people overlooking their achievements as writers and viewing them as merely spokespersons for a social movement. This is understandable since writers like Edmund White, Armistead Maupin, John Rechy, and Larry Kramer have been public figures whose political involvement has sometimes overshadowed their work as writers. Indeed, many of these men come from an era when the

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Gay Fiction Speaks: Conversations with Gay Novelists
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Between Men ~ between Women v
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Introduction xvii
  • One - James Purdy 1
  • Two - John Rechy 41
  • Three - Edmund White 75
  • Four - Andrew Holleran 113
  • Five - Armistead Maupin 151
  • Six - Felice Picano 185
  • Seven - Allan Gurganus 225
  • Eight - Ethan Mordden 261
  • Nine - Dennis Cooper 297
  • Ten - Alan Hollinghurst 331
  • Eleven - David Leavitt 367
  • Twelve - Patrick Gale 399
  • Between Men ~ between Women 441
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 442

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.