Gay Fiction Speaks: Conversations with Gay Novelists

By Richard Canning | Go to book overview

SEVEN
ALLAN GURGANUS

Allan Gurganus is best known for his fictionalization of the consequences of the American Civil War, Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All, and for his second novel concerning the impact of AIDS upon 1980s New York, Plays Well with Others. Born in North Carolina in 1947, at twelve Gurganus gave a one-man show of his oil paintings. On graduating from high school in 1965, he attended the Philadelphia Academy of Fine Arts. In 1966 Gurganus joined the Navy and, while on ship, started writing. He came out at twenty-one, and moved to New York to attend Sarah Lawrence College. In 1972 Gurganus won a scholarship to the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, where he was tutored and befriended by the novelist John Cheever. In 1974 Cheever successfully submitted Gurganus’s “Minor Heroism” to the New Yorker. Gurganus taught briefly at Stanford and Duke universities before returning to New York to teach part-time at Sarah Lawrence College.

In 1981 Gurganus began writing his first novel, the comic epic about the history of the South, Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All (New York: Knopf, 1989). Gurganus’s short stories, meanwhile, had appeared in the New Yorker, Harper’s, Granta, and anthologies such as Edmund White, ed., Faber Book of Gay Short Fiction (London: Faber and Faber, 1991). They were later collected in White People (New York: Knopf, 1991). Plays Well with Others (New York: Knopf, 1997), Gurganus’s most recent novel, is set in New York in the period before and during the devastation caused by AIDS. His story “Preserva-

-225-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Gay Fiction Speaks: Conversations with Gay Novelists
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Between Men ~ between Women v
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Introduction xvii
  • One - James Purdy 1
  • Two - John Rechy 41
  • Three - Edmund White 75
  • Four - Andrew Holleran 113
  • Five - Armistead Maupin 151
  • Six - Felice Picano 185
  • Seven - Allan Gurganus 225
  • Eight - Ethan Mordden 261
  • Nine - Dennis Cooper 297
  • Ten - Alan Hollinghurst 331
  • Eleven - David Leavitt 367
  • Twelve - Patrick Gale 399
  • Between Men ~ between Women 441
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 442

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.