Gay Fiction Speaks: Conversations with Gay Novelists

By Richard Canning | Go to book overview

EIGHT
ETHAN MORDDEN

Ethan Mordden is best known to gay readers for four volumes comprising the “Buddies” series of gay stories set in Manhattan, as well as for an epic account of postwar gay life in America, How Long Has This Been Going On? He is also the author of around twenty works of nonfiction on musicals, opera, theater, and classical music. Born in Pennsylvania and raised there—and in Venice, Italy, and Long Island—Mordden took a degree in history at the University of Pennsylvania before moving to New York. His publishing career began in 1976 with a study of the Broadway musical.

Mordden’s fiction first appeared as a regular autobiographical column—“Is There a Book in This?”—in the pioneering gay literary magazine Christopher Street. I’ve a Feeling We’re Not in Kansas Anymore: Tales from Gay Manhattan (New York: St. Martin’s, 1985), the first collection of these pieces, was followed by the equally successful Buddies (New York: St. Martin’s, 1986) and Everybody Loves You (New York: St. Martin’s, 1988).

Mordden turned to other projects in the nine years before volume four of the “Buddies” series appeared—Some Men Are Lookers (New York: St. Martin’s, 1997). His first novel, One Last Waltz (New York: St. Martin’s, 1986), concerned a family of Irish-American immigrants. Under the pseudonym “M. J. Verlaine,” Mordden published a collection of short pieces about heterosexual life in Manhattan, A Bad Man Is Easy to Find (New York: St. Martin’s, 1991). He has written two further novels: the epic account of gay liberation and its aftermath, How Long Has

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Gay Fiction Speaks: Conversations with Gay Novelists
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Between Men ~ between Women v
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Introduction xvii
  • One - James Purdy 1
  • Two - John Rechy 41
  • Three - Edmund White 75
  • Four - Andrew Holleran 113
  • Five - Armistead Maupin 151
  • Six - Felice Picano 185
  • Seven - Allan Gurganus 225
  • Eight - Ethan Mordden 261
  • Nine - Dennis Cooper 297
  • Ten - Alan Hollinghurst 331
  • Eleven - David Leavitt 367
  • Twelve - Patrick Gale 399
  • Between Men ~ between Women 441
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