Marx's Concept of Man

By Karl Marx; Erich Fromm et al. | Go to book overview

JENNY MARX TO JOSEPH WEYDEMEYER

London, May 20, 1850

Dear Herr Weydemeyer,

It will soon be a year since I was given such friendly and cordial hospitality by you and your dear wife, since I felt so comfortably at home in your house. All that time I have not given you a sign of life: I was silent when your wife wrote me such a friendly letter and did not even break that silence when we received the news of the birth of your child. My silence has often oppressed me, but most of the time I was unable to write and even today I find it hard, very hard.

Circumstances, however, force me to take up my pen. I beg you to send us as soon as possible any money that has been or will be received from the Revue.1We need it very, very much. Certainly nobody can reproach us with ever having made much case of the sacrifices we have been making and bearing for years, the public has never or almost never been informed of our circumstances; my husband is very sensitive in such matters and he would rather sacrifice his last than resort to democratic begging like officially recognized "great men." But he could have expected active and energetic support for his Revue from his friends, particularly those in Cologne. He could have expected such support first of all from where his sacrifices for Rheinische Zeitung were known. But instead of that the business has been

____________________
1
"Neue Rheinische Zeitung". Politisch-ökonomische Revue. -- Ed.

-242-

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Marx's Concept of Man
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents xi
  • 1 - The Falsification of Marx's Concepts 1
  • 2 - Marx's Historical Materialism 8
  • 3 - The Problem of Consciousness, Social Structure 20
  • 4 - The Nature of Man 25
  • 5 - Alienation 44
  • 6 - Marx's Concept of Socialism 59
  • 7 - The Continuity in Marx's Thought 70
  • 8 - Marx the Man 80
  • Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts 85
  • Translator's Notes 87
  • Preface to Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts 90
  • First Manuscript 93
  • Second Manuscript 110
  • Third Manuscript 119
  • From German Ideology 197
  • Preface to a Contribution to the Karl Marx Critique of Political Economy 217
  • From Marx's "Introduction to the Critique of Hegel's Philosophy of Law. Critique of Religion" 220
  • Reminiscences of Marx 221
  • Jenny Marx to Joseph Weydemeyer 242
  • Karl Marx 248
  • Confession 257
  • Karl Marx's Funeral 258
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