Marx's Concept of Man

By Karl Marx; Erich Fromm et al. | Go to book overview

KARL MARX

Eleanor Marx-Aveling


(A Few Stray Notes)

My Austrian friends ask me to send them some recollections of my father. They could not well have asked me for anything more difficult. But Austrian men and women are making so splendid a fight for the cause for which Karl Marx lived and worked, that one cannot say nay to them. And so I will even try to send them a few stray, disjointed notes about my father.

Many strange stories have been told about Karl Marx, from that of his "millions" (in pounds sterling, of course, no smaller coin would do), to that of his having been subventioned by Bismarck, whom he is supposed to have constantly visited in Berlin during the time of the International (!). But after all, to those who knew Karl Marx no legend is funnier than the common one which pictures him a morose, bitter, unbending, unapproachable man, a sort of Jupiter Tonans, ever hurling thunder, never known to smile, sitting aloof and alone in Olympus. This picture of the cheeriest, gayest soul that ever breathed, of a man brimming over with humor and goodhumor, whose hearty laugh was infectious and irresistible, of the kindliest, gentlest, most sympathetic of companions, is a standing wonder -- and amusement -- to those who knew him.

In his home life, as in his intercourse with friends, and even with mere acquaintances, I think one might say that Karl Marx's main characteristics were his unbounded good-humor and his unlimited sympathy. His kindness and patience were really sublime. A less sweet-

-248-

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Marx's Concept of Man
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents xi
  • 1 - The Falsification of Marx's Concepts 1
  • 2 - Marx's Historical Materialism 8
  • 3 - The Problem of Consciousness, Social Structure 20
  • 4 - The Nature of Man 25
  • 5 - Alienation 44
  • 6 - Marx's Concept of Socialism 59
  • 7 - The Continuity in Marx's Thought 70
  • 8 - Marx the Man 80
  • Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts 85
  • Translator's Notes 87
  • Preface to Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts 90
  • First Manuscript 93
  • Second Manuscript 110
  • Third Manuscript 119
  • From German Ideology 197
  • Preface to a Contribution to the Karl Marx Critique of Political Economy 217
  • From Marx's "Introduction to the Critique of Hegel's Philosophy of Law. Critique of Religion" 220
  • Reminiscences of Marx 221
  • Jenny Marx to Joseph Weydemeyer 242
  • Karl Marx 248
  • Confession 257
  • Karl Marx's Funeral 258
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