Campaigns and the Court: The U.S. Supreme Court in Presidential Elections

By Donald Crier Stephenson Jr. | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

No one completes even a modest undertaking like this one without the help of others, seen and unseen. The notes reflect my debt to prior scholarship and reveal the rich resources available to anyone exploring constitutional government in the United States. Students in my courses on American politics, constitutional law, and the Supreme Court at Franklin & Marshall College have made it possible for me to say, for nearly three decades, that I am indeed fortunate to be paid for doing what I enjoy. More directly, I owe much to John Michel of Columbia University Press. He first encouraged me to write this book and then provided the right combination of encouragment, prompting, and patience along the way. John also arranged for chapter-by-chapter reviews of the manuscript from Thomas J. Baldino of Wilkes University and Robert G. Seddig of Allegheny College. Their comments and suggestions proved valuable throughout, as did those from series editor Robert Shapiro of Columbia University. Sheldon Goldman of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Ellis Katz of Temple University, and John B. Taylor of Washington College were among those who, with Professors Baldino, Seddig, and Shapiro, reviewed the prospectus. Alexander Thorpe, Beth Wilson, and Susan Pensak have provided indispensable assistance through the production process. Nonetheless, any defects or errors or other sins of omission or commission that remain are my responsibility alone.

Finally, I am thankful for my family. My parents, Donald and Katherine Stephenson, along with everything else they have done for me, first interested me in politics and law. As a Georgia judge for a quarter-century who had to face the voters of Newton County every four years, my father gave me an early glimpse into the connection between campaigns and courts. My mother, a member of one of the first classes of women admitted to the University of Georgia, seems to have forgotten nothing from her

-xiii-

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