Kidnap City: Cold War Berlin

By Arthur L. Smith | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2
EARLY VICTIMS

The strange aftermath of the war in Berlin found two of the most powerful allies who had joined together to defeat Nazi Germany engaged in a fierce competition with each other for the services of their defeated enemy. Ironically, neither the Americans nor the Russians could fully implement their intelligence operations without the assistance of the Germans. Unfortunately for those Germans who chose to assist their former enemies, they became expendable, but not their employers: “There was a tacit understanding between the Western and Soviet intelligence organizations. They would not kill or kidnap each other’s staff people.”1

This appears to have been about the only rule of the game, for once both sides began enlisting Germans with an Abwehr (former German military intelligence) background, all guidelines vanished. Soliciting information and recruiting German agents became a tricky business that very often assumed convolutions that must have mystified even the most experienced CIA or KGB men at times. This was especially true when dealing with those German agents who changed sides if the price was right, or functioned as double agents. One of the most interesting examples of this was the case of a former major in the Abwehr named Hans Kemritz.2

A favorite Russian tactic was to use a former Abwehr man to help locate his old comrades who might be on the wanted list, or could prove useful by virtue of their intelligence experience. They chose well in se-

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Kidnap City: Cold War Berlin
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • List of Abbreviations xv
  • Part I - Why Berlin? 1
  • Chapter 1 - Background 3
  • Chapter 2 - Early Victims 17
  • Part II - Mixed Messages 33
  • Chapter 3 - U.S. Intelligence in Berlin 35
  • Chapter 4 - New Friends 49
  • Part III - The Kemritz Affair 63
  • Chapter 5 - Hans Kemritz 65
  • Chapter 6 - U.S. versus the German Courts 81
  • Part IV - Partners 95
  • Chapter 7 - Working Together 97
  • Chapter 8 - The Linse Kidnaping 113
  • Chapter 9 - The Interrogation 127
  • Chapter 10 - More Kidnapings 143
  • Part V - Conclusions 167
  • Chapter 11 - Cold War Berlin 169
  • Appendix 181
  • Bibliography 185
  • Index 195
  • About the Author 200
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