Kidnap City: Cold War Berlin

By Arthur L. Smith | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 3
U.S. INTELLIGENCE IN BERLIN

West Berlin provided the United States and its Western Allies with an opportunity too valuable to ignore: the city was the best place in the world from which to conduct spy operations against the Soviet Union.

A number of the nations in World War II already had well-established intelligence services long before the war began, but this was not true of the United States. It was with the advent of war and the emergence of America as a world power that the necessity for a permanent intelligence service responsible for state security was recognized. The war had illustrated the tremendous importance to the Americans of intelligence as an arm of government, and its role in international relations. As the United States became locked into the postwar arms race with the Soviet Union, the only nation capable of challenging America’s world leadership, intelligence operations had already began to receive top priority in all aspects of foreign relations.

During the war the United States had created the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) as a primary intelligence agency headed by William Donovan. At first, it was a learning process for the United States, but soon the OSS began to grasp the art of secret warfare. In recognizing the crucial importance of intelligence in developing policy, the Americans were also able learn from their British ally, who had long since regarded the practice of intelligence as an essential tool in the conduct of government.

-35-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Kidnap City: Cold War Berlin
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • List of Abbreviations xv
  • Part I - Why Berlin? 1
  • Chapter 1 - Background 3
  • Chapter 2 - Early Victims 17
  • Part II - Mixed Messages 33
  • Chapter 3 - U.S. Intelligence in Berlin 35
  • Chapter 4 - New Friends 49
  • Part III - The Kemritz Affair 63
  • Chapter 5 - Hans Kemritz 65
  • Chapter 6 - U.S. versus the German Courts 81
  • Part IV - Partners 95
  • Chapter 7 - Working Together 97
  • Chapter 8 - The Linse Kidnaping 113
  • Chapter 9 - The Interrogation 127
  • Chapter 10 - More Kidnapings 143
  • Part V - Conclusions 167
  • Chapter 11 - Cold War Berlin 169
  • Appendix 181
  • Bibliography 185
  • Index 195
  • About the Author 200
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 200

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.