North Korea: A Strange Socialist Fortress

By Hy-Sang Lee | Go to book overview

5
1970s: Mounting Arms and Myopic
Push for Economic Growth

OVERVIEW

By the turn of the 1970s, North Korea had become a bristling fortress commandeering supplies from a stunted economy in its territory. The stagnant agriculture and the tiny consumer-goods sector made for a tenuous supply base for the fortress and its ordnance plants. From an objective standpoint, one would have expected to see a movement toward resource reallocation to ease the imbalance, if only to sustain the militarization program for the long pull. There was another reality that called for Pyongyang to desist in its shortsighted push for arms buildup and pursue more of a balance in military-economic strength for the long run. South Korea was gaining economic strength in the context of U.S. troops committed to staying there, and the South did not seem headed toward an impending revolutionary phrase that would invite the North’s military might to march in and take over.

The Republic of Korea (ROK) had been a surprise success story of the 1960s in the world economy. A determined military regime improved both the living conditions for the people and the industrial base of the economy. The construction of the soon-to-be renowned Pohang Steel Corporation was launched in December 1969. One year later, there was a joint commissioning ceremony for a naphtha cracking plant and its eight allied factories at Ulsan, signaling the advent of a modern petrochemical complex in the South.1 Taking off from these two key projects of the Second Five-Year Plan (1967–1971), Seoul officially launched a major push for heavy industry in the Third Five-Year Plan (1972–1976). In introducing the third plan, President Park Chung Hee wrote, “Em-

-81-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
North Korea: A Strange Socialist Fortress
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 250

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.