North Korea: A Strange Socialist Fortress

By Hy-Sang Lee | Go to book overview

Epilogue on the Kim-Kim Summit

Prior to this book’s publication, an historic summit meeting between President Kim Dae-jung and Chairman Kim Jong I1 took place in Pyongyang in June 2000. Widely acclaimed as a breakthrough, the summit went surprisingly smoothly, and even in the days just following this first-ever event, several concrete outcomes became apparent.

One of the most obvious and very important results of the summit was the gracious and gregarious debut of Kim Jong I1 into the international community. The chairman was not only amicable and courteous in his reception of President Kim, but also made a gracious concession to his guest on the all-important question of unification. Was Kim Jong II leading the North to an amicably reunited Korea in his new status as a quick-witted, self-deprecating statesman? Or did he have his own more menacing agenda? An answer may be found in the words that interpreted the gracious concession.

The concession appeared in the summit communiqué, North-South Joint Declaration, in relation to the unification formula. It involved two similar formula terms in Korean, “yonbangje” and “yonhapje,” which were both originally translated by North and South Korea into the same English word, “confederation.” How these Korean words and their English translation played in the communiqué provides the beginning of understanding the significance of the summit. In order to underscore their importance, we will first introduce how Pyongyang interpreted the concession four days after the summit ended.

According to the (North) Korean Central News Agency (KCNA), the daily organ of the North Korean communist party, Rodong Sinmun, pub-

-237-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
North Korea: A Strange Socialist Fortress
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 250

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.