Greek Mythography in the Roman World

By Alan Cameron | Go to book overview

Appendix 2
Three Versions of Hyginus

I print with minimal comment the three cases where the PsDosithean excerpts of Hyginus are substantial enough to allow a direct comparison between the standard Latin text (lefthand column) and Ps-Dositheus’s two versions. As was proper for his purposes, Goetz offered a diplomatic transcription, without word division or accents. Rose transcribed the Greek (though oddly not the Latin) in an appendix, Boriaud both Greek and Latin (unfortunately with no page or section numbers).1 I have made a few obvious corrections and one supplement in the Greek, but little in the Latin (righthand column), given the glossographer’s uncertain command of Latin.

1. Standard text (Hyg. 138):Philyra quae in tiliam versa est. Saturnus Iovem cum quaereret per terras, in Thracia cum Philyra Oceani filia in equum conversus concubuit, quae ex eo peperit Chironem centaurum, qui artem medicam primus invenisse dicitur. Philyra postquam invisitatam speciem se peperisse vidit, petit ab Iove ut se in aliquam speciem commutaret; quae in arborem philyram, hoc est tiliam, commutata est.Ps-Dositheus Graecus (CGL iii.59):Ps-DositheusLatinus (CGL iii.59): De Filura. Saturnus Iovem ubique inquirens, demutatus est [i]n equum, et Filuram Oceani filiam pregnantem faciet et enixa est Chironem centaurum, qui primus medicinae artis disciplinae adinventor fuit. Filura autem confusa propter invisam fili figuram, deorum misericordia in cognominatam arborem demutata est.
2. Standard text (Hyg. 144): Prometheus. Homines antea ab immortalibus ignem petebant, neque in perpetuum servarePs-Dositheus Graecus (ibid. 59):Ps-Dositheus Latinus (ibid. 59): De Prometheos. Prometheus ignem furatus de caelo, abscondens in ferula detulit hominibus,

1. H. J. Rose, Hygini Fabulae (Leiden 1933), 174–81; J.-Y. Boriaud, Hygin Fables (Paris 1997), 181–93.

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