Habermas, Kristeva, and Citizenship

By Noëlle McAfee | Go to book overview

1 Habermas’s Theory of
Postconventional Identity

Jürgen Habermas came of age in the aftermath of World War Π, in Germany, an ocean apart from the Frankfurt School of intellectuals who had fled fascism for the United States. Although he ultimately shared many of the aims and concerns of the members of the Institute for Social Research, his route to them had been distinctly different. As one interviewer writes:

Habermas was 15 when the Allies defeated Germany in 1945. He had
been a member of the Hitler Youth and had been sent, during the last
months of the war, to “man the western defenses.” His bourgeois fa-
ther had been a “passive sympathizer” with Nazism. Nazi society was
the only one the young Habermas had known. Then the Nuremberg
war-crimes trials started, and the first documentary films on the con-
centration camps appeared. “All at once we saw that we had been liv-
ing in a politically criminal system,” Habermas has explained. His po-
litical life began with this awakening. It established what he labels the
major “motif” of his politics: a vigilance against any recurrence of such
”politically criminal” behavior. (Stephens 1994)

Learning of the atrocities committed by his fellow Germans, Habermas felt firsthand the dismay with modernity that had led Adorno and Horkheimer to a “negative dialectics,” a pessimistic view of the progress of modernity. But where Adorno had become disenchanted with the Enlightenment, the young Habermas became all the more

-23-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Habermas, Kristeva, and Citizenship
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction Politics and Citizens 1
  • Part I - Subjectivity in the Making 21
  • 1 - Habermas's Theory of Postconventional Identity 23
  • 2 - Subjects-In-Process 56
  • Part II 79
  • 3 - Habermas on Citizens and Politics 81
  • 4 - the Split Subject in the Public Sphere 102
  • Part III 127
  • 5 - Relational Subjectivity 129
  • 6 - Complementary Agency 151
  • 7 - Ways of Knowing 164
  • 8 - Deliberative Communities 184
  • Bibliography 193
  • Index 205
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 220

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.