The Crisis of Israelite Religion: Transformation of Religious Tradition in Exilic and Post-Exilic Times

By Bob Becking; Marjo C. A. Korpel | Go to book overview

Janet Tollington Cambridge — United Kingdom


Readings in Haggai:
From the Prophet to the Completed Book,
a Changing Message in Changing Times

1 Introduction

The book of Haggai dates the prophet's words to three specific occasions during the year 520 BCE; the first day of the sixth month, the twenty-first day of the seventh month and the twenty-fourth day of the ninth month. It also refers to activity taking place on the twentyfourth day of the sixth month. There is no reason to doubt the year of the prophet's ministry since the message makes direct reference to the start of the programme of rebuilding the Jerusalem temple in earnest. It is commonly accepted that this work took place between 520 and 516 BCE. However, it is worth considering whether the precise dating is factual or a feature of the compiler's, or an editor's work; and whether there is theological significance in the given dates. These issues will be discussed later in this paper.

The general context for the prophet's ministry is within a community whose religion is under stress because the temple is still in ruins and there is no Davidic monarch on the throne. These were two of the main tenets of the pre-exilic faith of Judah, alongside occupation of the promised land, to which the exiles had now been able to return. The community included some who had remained in the land throughout the exile, some who had moved in from surrounding territories such as Edom during the exile and some who had returned from Babylon over the past few years.1 Hag. 1:6 indicates that poor harvests were being experienced, there was poverty and deprivation, and hard work alone was inadequate to transform the situation. Community effort was concentrated on building up society and the economy, on establishing themselves as an identifiable people in the Persian empire. This was the priority and there were insufficient resources to

1 The edict of Cyrus, 538 BCE, has generally been regarded as the event which initiated the return of the exiles cf. Ezra 1. However extant records indicate that few returned during Cyrus's reign, whilst early in the time of Darius around 45,000 went back to Jerusalem, J.L. Berquist, Judaism in Persia's Shadow, Minneapolis 1995, 26–7. An absence of archaeological finds in and around Jerusalem indicating Judah's connections with Persia prior to the reign of Cambyses (530–522 BCE) suggests that his conquest of Egypt in 525 BCE may have provided an impetus for the exiles to return.

-194-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Crisis of Israelite Religion: Transformation of Religious Tradition in Exilic and Post-Exilic Times
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 316

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.