The Right to National Self-Determination: The Faroe Islands and Greenland

By Sjúrður Skaale | Go to book overview

1 - Summary and Main
Conclusions

Ole Espersen


Introduction

As the preface makes clear, this volume is the work of a group of people who have written individual chapters for which the named authors are responsible. On the other hand, extensive discussions took place among the authors and our common goal is, of course, reflected in each chapter. This common goal is to be a source of information to the reader on the history, the constitutional developments, the general context within international law with regard to the notions of “people” and “self-determination”, the relationships or possible relationships between the Faroe Islands and Greenland to international organizations and the (former) position within the United Nations system towards these two political entities.

The following summary and main conclusions represent in brief the outcome of some of the various chapters as well as the outcome of the discussions within the group. But I wish to stress that each chapter deserves to be read in full. This is especially true because summarizing is difficult, particularly as the authors have different backgrounds (lawyers, political scientists etc.). This fact we found to be quite natural, as hardly any international subject represents such a mixture of law and politics as does the subject of “peoples” and the subject of peoples and their right to self-determination.


Summary of Some Chapters of the Work

The Land of Maybe: A Survey of Faroese Constitutional History, by Kâri à Rógvi

Kári á Rógvi has given his article the title, The Land of Maybe, because, in his view, this reflects the fact that the Faroese People are known to have had difficulties in agreeing on their own position with regard to independence. The Faroes is a “Land of Maybe”, it is suggested, because the whim of the weather gives the Faroese People a pretext to be indecisive

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