The Right to National Self-Determination: The Faroe Islands and Greenland

By Sjúrður Skaale | Go to book overview

4 - The Status of the Greenlandic
Inuit
Are the Greenlandic Inuit a People, an Indigenous People,
a Minority or a Nation? A Practical, Philosophical and
Conceptual Investigation1

Mininnguaq Kleist


Introduction

In order to be able to answer the question that headlines this paper, it will be necessary to try to define or at least narrow down the meanings of the four concepts and terms: “people”, “indigenous people”, “minority" and “nation” (all these concepts and terms are understood in the context of peoples). What is it that differentiates them from each other and in what senses are they alike?

In the arena of international law and politics there are different definitions of the above concepts and terms. These are the definitions which are perhaps the most relevant in this context and can be the most influential for the lives of the people they affect — they generate different legal rights. There may be other definitions of these concepts within other fields such as sociology and ethnography, but the consequences and the weight they are given in the field of international law and politics appear to be secondary, even though the definitions you find in international law and politics hopefully are inspired by or originate from the definitions of sociology and ethnography. I write “hopefully” because these

1 I would like to thank the members of the Working Group for interesting and inspiring discussions, and for having read earlier drafts of this paper and commenting on them: Professors Lauri Hannikainen, Ole Espersen and Gudmundur Alfredsson, advisor Bogi Eliasen and our Working Group’s Secretary, Sjúrður Skaale. I would also like to thank my close friend Allan Olsen for linguistic and clarifying suggestions. In spite of their help, any errors and views found in this paper are entirely mine.

-95-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Right to National Self-Determination: The Faroe Islands and Greenland
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 212

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.