Seers, Sibyls, and Sages in Hellenistic-Roman Judaism

By John J. Collins | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SEVENTEEN

One of the more novel approaches to the study of apocalypticism in recent years has been that of the Italian scholar Paolo Sacchi. Sacchi has argued in a series of articles, recently collected in his book L'Apocalittica Giudaica e la sua Storia,1 that apocalypticism should be understood primarily as an ideology. He distinguishes this ideology from the literary genre apocalypse, but remains vague on what if any relationship there is between them. He looks for the essence of the tradition in its origin, which he finds in the Enochic Book of the Watchers. Here, he claims, the generative idea lies in the notion that sin is not of human origin but is antecedent to human choice. The fall of the Watchers is the primordial sin. The apocalyptic tradition that unfolds in 1 Enoch addresses this generative idea in various ways. The tradition is not static. The Book of Jubilees marks a significant development along the same lines as the Book of the Watchers. Mastema, or Satan, now emerges as the personalized embodiment of evil. The Epistle of Enoch even records a contradiction of the original conception:

I swear to you, you sinners, that as a mountain has not, and will not,
become a slave, nor a hill a woman's maid, so sin was not sent upon
the earth, but man of himself created it (1 Enoch 98:4).

The Doctrine of the two Spirits at Qumran (which Sacchi attributes to the Teacher of Righteousness) is alleged to be completely in line with the Book of the Watchers, although it does not share the eschatology of the Enochic book.2 The continuity lies in the fact that evil is attributed to a supernatural source.

Sacchi's view of apocalypticism has now been taken up by Florentino García Martínez, and used as one of the pillars of the socalled “Groningen hypothesis” of the origin of the Qumran sect.3

1 P. Sacchi, L'Apocalittica Giudaica e la sua Storia (Brescia: Paideia, 1990). See the endorsement of Sacchi's approach by F. García Martínez, “Encore l'Apocalyptique,” JSJ 17(1987) 231.

2 Sacchi, L'Apocalittica Giudaica, 76.

3 F. García Martínez, “Qumran Origins and Early History: A Groningen Hypothesis,” Folia Orientalia 25(1989) 113–36; García Martínez and van der Woude, “A ‘Groningen’ Hypothesis of Qumran Origins and Early History,” RevQ 14(1990) 521–41.

-287-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Seers, Sibyls, and Sages in Hellenistic-Roman Judaism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 438

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.