The Marriage of Roman Soldiers (13 BC-AD 235): Law and Family in the Imperial Army

By Sara Elise Phang | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ELEVEN
THE MARRIAGE BAN AS RECRUITMENT POLICY

1. Introduction

Much has been written about the marriage ban and the veterans’ privileges as possible means of inducing the recruitment of soldiers’ sons, whom scholars have identified as the soldiers with tribe Pollia and the origo castris. Especially in so-called laterculi, dedications which list the legionary veterans that were discharged in a given year, a varying number of soldiers appear with the tribe Pollia and origo castris. Where the name of a city is usually found, indicating the soldier’s place of birth, there is instead (ex) castris, “from the camp.”1 According to Mommsen and many followers,2 the soldiers with tribe

1 Egypt: CIL III 6627 (Koptos, Aug.-Tib.), 2 (6%) of 36 soldiers; CIL III 6580
(Alexandria, A.D. 168–195), 24 (62%) of 39 soldiers. Papyri: Fink (1971) no. 31;
37; 39; 70.

Africa: Le Bohec, Troisième légion (1989), 495–503 surveys the origines of legionaries
in leg. III Aug. 39 (14%) of 281 soldiers with origo preserved are castris in the period
117–161; 13 (21%) of 65 in 161–192; 188 (36%) of 524 soldiers in 193–238.

Second century: CIL VIII 2994; BCTH (1954), p. 169, 4. A.D. 117–160: CIL
2789 = 18137 + 18085; 3151; 18067; 18084; 18085; 18087. A.D. 161–193: 2565 =
18063; 2566; 3247. Third century: 2564 = 18052 + 2568 = 18055; 2565a = 18053;
2567 = 18054; 2568 = 18055; 2569 = 18056; 2586; 2618 = 18096; 18068; 18086;
1899, 91; 1899, 92; 1917/18, 29; 1917/18, 57; 1967, 580; BCTH
(1905), p. 238 n. 21; Libyca IV (1956), p. 118 n. 28; G.-Ch. Picard, Castellum Dimmidi
(1947), no. 1, 4, 20, 22, 32, 37, 41.

Moesia: CIL III 14507 (Viminacium), 7 (6%) of 124 soldiers.

Single individuals: CIL III 11218 (Carnuntum); CIL III 7505 (Troesmis); CIL III
104 (Salona); CIL XI 56 (Italy); CIL XVI 128 (Italy); 1957, 99; 1906, 124.

2 The idea originated with Wilmanns, CIL VIII Lambaesis. Mommsen (1884),
11 n. 1: “The tribe Pollia is, as was always clear but which is now established
beyond all doubt, here should be treated as personal and as conferred upon recruits
lacking a tribe upon their enlistment in the legion”; Mommsen, commentary on
CIL III 6627; CIL III p. 2011ff.

In the second century after Christ, one is struck by the number of legionary
recruits named for the camp rather than a legitimate home, born without a
doubt from soldiers’ relationships with mostly peregrine women, due to the
increasing toleration of women around the camps…. These [soldiers] lacked
the Roman citizenship in law, but it is most plausibly understood that they
usually received the citizenship when they enlisted, because the tribe which
they bear is not hereditary, but the tribe Pollia, conferred with the citizenship.

-326-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Marriage of Roman Soldiers (13 BC-AD 235): Law and Family in the Imperial Army
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 471

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.