Anglo-Chinese Encounters since 1800: War, Trade, Science, and Governance

By Wang Gungwu | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I am grateful to the Smuts Memorial Fund for the invitation in 1995 to give the Commonwealth Lectures at the University of Cambridge in 1996–1997. A couple of months before I was supposed to give these lectures, unforeseen circumstances forced me to cancel my trip altogether. This caused great inconvenience to the organisers, and especially to my host, Gordon Johnson, President of Wolfson College, Cambridge.

In preparation for the lectures, I sketched out the story of Anglo-Chinese encounters, in China, in Britain and in the Commonwealth. I had just spent nearly ten years working on the edge of China in the last major British colony of Hong Kong, and recently translated to Singapore, a member state of the Commonwealth that was already over thirty years old. The two island port cities seemed to be good starting points from which I could make my excursions. I have never strictly observed modern political boundaries in my readings of modern Chinese history. As someone who was born Chinese in a Dutch colony, Java in the Netherlands East Indies, but has lived all but three years of my life in countries that are, or were, parts of the British Empire and Commonwealth, I had often wondered if I could bring the Chinese and British stories together in some way. The Smuts Commonwealth Lectures would make an interesting framework for me to reflect on some of the encounters the two peoples have had since 1800.

-viii-

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Anglo-Chinese Encounters since 1800: War, Trade, Science, and Governance
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vi
  • Acknowledgments viii
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - "To Fight" 13
  • 3 - "To Trade" 43
  • 4 - "To Convert" 75
  • 5 - "To Rule" 107
  • 6 - Beyond Waley''s List 137
  • Notes 151
  • Index 193
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