Master of Adventure: The Worlds of Edgar Rice Burroughs

By Richard A. Lupoff | Go to book overview

MICHAEL MOORCOCK


Foreword

It's probably fair to say that I owe my career to Edgar Rice Burroughs. From the age of fourteen I produced an ERB fanzine, Burroughsiana, before I really knew what fanzines were. Through it I discovered the world of science-fiction fandom and began to exchange letters with Richard Lupoff!

When I was sixteen I interviewed the editor of Tarzan Adventures in London. He didn't much like my interview, but his assistant liked it a lot. Before I knew it I was writing a series of articles about Burroughs for that magazine. Tarzan Adventures published reprints of the Sunday newspaper strips as well as original text features and fiction. Soon the assistant editor, the new editor, had commissioned a serial, an ERB pastiche, for Tarzan Adventures. This was Sojan the Swordsman, my first fantasy hero. The new editor offered me the job of assistant. My career in journalism and fiction had begun.

In the late 1950s, by the time I was seventeen, I was editing the magazine and filling it with all kinds of Burroughs-derived science fiction and fantasy as well as more features about Edgar Rice Burroughs himself. By the 1960s, when my magazine New Worlds needed financing, I wrote a series of Burroughs-type novels to support it (more of this later). My last close association with Burroughs was writing The Land that Time Forgot for Amicus Films in the early 1970s. As Lupoff does, I regard that novel as probably Burroughs' finest, with an intriguing idea that puts it firmly in the realm of science fiction, even though the form of the story is more of a fantasy adventure. I worked with Jim Cawthorn, a long-time friend and Burroughs illustrator, who had also drawn strips and written stories for Tarzan Adventures. Cawthorn broke the book down into scenes. I then did the finished script, turning the stereotypical German U-boat commander into, I hope, a subtler character who became the intellectual “voice” for the story's fascinating central idea, which Lupoff describes in detail here.

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Master of Adventure: The Worlds of Edgar Rice Burroughs
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 312

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.