The Jews of Bohemia and Moravia: Facing the Holocaust

By Livia Rothkirchen | Go to book overview

9
Gateway to Death
The Unique Character
of Ghetto Terezín
(Theresienstadt)

The ghettoization of the Jews within the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia was part of the global Nazi policy meant to serve several interim aims. The hopes nurtured by the Jewish leadership that it would forestall deportation “to the East” were shattered early on. Nevertheless, despite all odds, the struggle for the community's survival continued in various ways to the last.

Research focusing on the totality of Hitler's racial policy underlines the fact that victory in war and the annihilation of the Jews were parallel aims.1 Thus any plans or projects on the part of Jewish leaders or organizations to bring about a change were doomed to failure from the start. With hindsight we may assert, however, that there was still one important factor with some bearing upon the total execution of the “Final Solution”: the time coefficient, bringing the turning of the tide of war.2

Unlike other concentration camps, Theresienstadt had a dual role from the moment of its establishment in the fall of 1941: it was to serve both as Siedlungsgebiet (settlement) and Sammellager (assembly camp) and, as such, as a means for decimation of its population.3 After the Wannsee Conference on the “solution of the Jewish question,” held on January 20, 1942, a third function was added: it was to act as an alibi—to camouflage the ongoing annihilation process before the eyes of the free world. A special paragraph of the minutes referred to Theresienstadt euphemistically as an “old-age ghetto”: “It is intended not to evacuate Jews above the age of sixty-five but rather to remove them (überstellen) to an Altersghetto. Theresienstadt is under consideration [for this purpose]. Along with them Jews seriously wounded during the war [World War I] and Jews with military decorations (Iron Cross, First Class), will be taken to the old people's ghetto.”4

-233-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Jews of Bohemia and Moravia: Facing the Holocaust
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 448

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.