Cahokia: Domination and Ideology in the Mississippian World

By Timothy R. Pauketat; Thomas E. Emerson | Go to book overview

Thomas E. Emerson


10
Cahokian Elite Ideology and
the Mississippian Cosmos

de materialibus ad immaterialia

Twelfth-century comment by Abbot Sugar on his reconstruction of
the Abbey Church of St. Denis

In this chapter I intend to explore the realms of Mississippian cosmology and ideology within a framework of elite hierarchical power. Toward this end I will provide an interpretation of aspects of Cahokian cosmology, iconography, and symbolism as they are materialized in the world. Such a reading is made possible by examining Cahokian cosmology within the context of Eastern Woodlands native ethnohistory and ethnography and within the broader perspective of hierarchical societies. Furthermore, I propose that the manipulation of the cosmos by the Cahokian elite to stabilize and enhance their hierarchical position can be traced in that same material record. To examine that process, I will utilize the architectural, artifactual, settlement, and contextual archaeological evidence from the rural areas surrounding Cahokia.


Theoretical Position

In this study I have deliberately separated two concepts, that is, religion and ideology, that have become so intertwined in much anthropological research as to often be conceived of as synonymous (e.g., various papers in Demarest and Conrad 1992). Such a synonymy is detrimental to my goal of exploring the interactions of symbolism, cosmology, and world view within the hierarchical world of social and power relationships. Consequently, in this discussion I will use religion and ideology to refer to two very different relation

-190-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cahokia: Domination and Ideology in the Mississippian World
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 364

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.