Cahokia: Domination and Ideology in the Mississippian World

By Timothy R. Pauketat; Thomas E. Emerson | Go to book overview

References Cited

Abercrombie, Nicholas, Stephen Hill, and Bryan S. Turner

1980 The Dominant Ideology Thesis. London: George Allen and Unwin.

Ahler, Steven R., and Peter J. DePuydt

1987 A Report on the 1731 Powell Mound Excavations, Madison County, Illinois. Illinois State Museum Reports of Investigations 43. Springfield.

Ambrose, Stanley H.

1987 Chemical and isotopic techniques of diet reconstruction in eastern North America. In Emergent Horticultural Economies of the Eastern Woodlands, edited by W. F. Keegan, pp.87–107. Center for Archaeological Investigations Occasional Paper 7. Carbondale IL.

Anderson, David G.

1990a Political change in chiefdom societies: Cycling changes in the late prehistoric southeastern United States. Ph.D. diss., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Ann Arbor: University Microfilms.

1990b Stability and change in chiefdom-level societies: An examination of Mississippian political evolution on the South Atlantic slope. In Lamar Archaeology: Mississippian Chiefdoms in the Deep South edited by M. Williams and G. Shapiro, pp. 187–213. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.

1991 Examining prehistoric settlement distribution in eastern North America. Archaeology of Eastern North America 19:1–22.

1994a The Savannah River Chiefdoms: Political Change in the Late Prehistoric Southeast. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.

1994b Factional competition and the political evolution of Mississippian chiefdoms in the southeastern United States. In Factional Competition in the New World edited by Elizabeth M. Brumfiel and John W. Fox, pp.61–76. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

1994c Exploring the antiquity of interaction networks in the east. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southeastern Archaeological Conference, 9–12 November 1994, Lexington KY.

n.d. Examining chiefdoms in the Southeast: An application of multiscalar analysis. Manuscript prepared for the seminar “Great Towns and Regional Polities: Cultural Evolution in the U.S. Southwest and Southeast,” organized by Jill Neitzel, 5–12 March 1994, Amerind Foundation, Dragoon AZ.

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