Middle Innings: A Documentary History of Baseball, 1900-1948

By Dean A. Sullivan | Go to book overview

Bibliography

The best histories of baseball in the first half of the twentieth century remain Harold Seymour, Baseball: The Golden Age (New York: Oxford University Press, 1971), and the first two volumes of David Quentin Voigt's trilogy, American Baseball: From Gentleman's Sport to the Commissioner System (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1966), and American Baseball: From the Commissioners to Continental Expansion (1970; rpt., University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1990). Two recent single-volume histories are Benjamin G. Rader, Baseball: A History of America's Game (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1992), and Charles C. Alexander, Our Game: An American Baseball History (New York: Henry Holt, 1991). G. Edward White, Creating the National Pastime: Baseball Transforms Itself 1903–1953 (Princeton NJ: Princeton University Press, 1996), William Curran, Big Sticks: The Phenomenal Decade of Ruth, Gehrig, Cobb, and Hornsby (New York: William Morrow, 1990), and Richard C. Crepeau, Baseball: America's Diamond Mind, 1919–1941 (Orlando: University Presses of Florida, 1980), are excellent surveys that focus on this era.

Some of the finest baseball books concentrate on a single season. Among these are the trio by G. H. Fleming, The Unforgettable Season (New York: Fireside, 1981), Murderer's Row: The 1927 New York Yankees (New York: William Morrow, 1985), and The Dizziest Season: The Gashouse Gang Chases the Pennant (New York: William Morrow, 1984). Others include Mike Sowell, The Pitch That Killed: Carl Mays, Ray Chapman, and the Pennant Race of 1920 (New York: Macmillan, 1989); Talmadge Boston, 1939, Baseball's Pivotal Year: From the Golden Age to the Modern Era (Fort Worth TX: The Summit Group, 1994); Robert W. Creamer, Baseball in ′41 (New York: Viking, 1991); and Frederick Turner, When the Boys Came Back: Baseball and 1946 (New York: Henry Holt, 1996).

Although many fascinating and important individuals, such as Connie Mack, umpire Bill Klem, Negro League owner J. L. Wilkinson, journalists Francis Richter and Henry Chadwick, and players like Hal Chase and Tris Speaker, have not yet attracted biographers, many others have. Two of the most colorful baseball men of the era were captured by Robert W Creamer in Babe: The Legend Comes to Life (1974; New York: Fireside, 1992), and Stengel: His Life and Times (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1984; rpt., Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1996). Others examined for this book include Eugene C. Murdock, Ban Johnson: Czar of Baseball (Westport CT: Greenwood Press, 1982); Henry W Thomas, Walter Johnson: Base-

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Middle Innings: A Documentary History of Baseball, 1900-1948
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • 1 - A New Century Dawns 1
  • 2 - Baseball and Early-Twentieth-Century Popular Culture 35
  • 3 - Rumblings of Unrest 63
  • 4 - The Age of Ruth 91
  • 5 - Lights, Action, History 139
  • 6 - Baseball in Wartime and Peacetime 181
  • Bibliography 221
  • Acknowledgments 225
  • Index 227
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