The Fence and the River: Culture and Politics at the U.S.-Mexico Border

By Claire F. Fox | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction

1. This is the title of a performance by Guillermo Gómez-Peña and Luke Theodore Morrison. For an illustration, see Jeff Kelley, ed. of English text, The Border Art Workshop/Taller de Arte Fronterizo (BAW/TAF): 1984–1989, 51. See also Guillermo Gómez-Peña, “The Multicultural Paradigm: An Open Letter to the National Arts Community,” 26.

2. David Harvey, The Urban Experience, 192.

3. Guillermo Gómez-Peña, “Death on the Border: A Eulogy to Border Art,” 8–9.

4. Charles Tatum, “Introduction: Stasis and Change along the Rio Grande: Aristeo Brito's The Devil in Texas,” in El diablo en Texas/The Devil in Texas, by Aristeo Brito, 16.

5. Lawrence A. Herzog, Where North Meets South: Cities, Space, and Politics on the U.S.—Mexico Border, xii. See also Lawrence A. Herzog, ed., Planning the International Border Metropolis. I will use the phrase transfrontier metropolis throughout this study.

6. In 1961 the Mexican government introduced the Programa Nacional Fronterizo (PRONAF), which used public- and private-sector funds to subsidize border products and build up the infrastructure of border cities, especially facilities associated with tourism. Four years later, the Border Industrialization Program was announced, thereby laying the groundwork for the maquiladora program. See John S. Evans, “Taxation and Fiscal Policy,” in The Borderlands Sourcebook, ed. Ellwyn Stoddard, Richard L. Nostrand, and Jonathan P. West, 173; and Oscar J. Martinez, Border Boom Town: Ciudad Juárez since 1848, 116–17.

7. Robert Alvarez, “The Border as Social System: The California Case,” 120.

8. Lawrence A. Herzog, ed., Changing Boundaries in the Americas: New Perspectives on the U.S.—Mexican, Central American, and South American Borders, 6.

9. Herzog, Changing Boundaries, 21.

10. I would like to thank Chris Lion of the Office of Inter-American Affairs, U.S. Department of Commerce, Washington DC, for providing me with information about regional trade blocs. Additional general information may be found in the following articles: Joachim Bamrud, “Uniting Forces: The Integration of the Hemisphere,” and “Expanding the Markets: The Unprecedented Trade Boom.”

Specific information about the CACM may be found in Resource Center Bulletin, spec, issue “Trade

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