3
Fiction to the Second Powers

Toward the end of Gain, a woman living through the last stages of cancer learns that, after months of unsponsored research against smiling resistance from company flacks, the cause of her illness has been isolated and the firm might be made to settle:

Sue them, she thinks. Every penny they are worth. Break them up for
parts.

And in the next blink: a weird dream of peace. It makes no difference
whether this business gave her cancer. They have given her everything else.
Taken her life and molded it in every way imaginable, plus six degrees
beyond imagining. Changed her life so greatly that not even cancer can
change it more than halfway back. (320)

The garden, whose tending was a Sunday refuge from her own corporate workweek, is also the source of the chemical that kills her. Before the cancer, she had “never thought twice about Clare” (6). The company, like the ads and school programs and television station it sponsors, is too pervasive to command special notice in the Midwestern town where it's headquartered.

She hums the corporate theme song to herself sometimes, without
realizing.…Two pots in her medicine cabinet bear the logo, one to apply

-54-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cognitive Fictions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Electronic Mediations ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction ix
  • 1 - A Media Theory of the Unconscious 1
  • 2 - Mapping the Cor(E)Tex(T): Thomas Pynchon 25
  • 3 - Fiction to the Second Powers 54
  • 4 - Solitary Invention: Observing Auster's Observations 77
  • 5 - David Markson at the End of the Line 99
  • A Media Migration: toward a Potential Literature 119
  • Notes 145
  • Works Cited 153
  • Index 159
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 172

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.