Modern Papua New Guinea

By Laura Zimmer-Tamakoshi | Go to book overview

Part Three
THE NEW SOCIETY

IN TRADITIONAL PAPUA NEW GUINEAN societies, old and young, male and female had their special roles to play (cf. Brown and Buchbinder 1976; Glasse and Meggitt 1965; Strathern, M. 1972). While some anthropologists have demonstrated that there was more inequality in traditional Papua New Guinean societies than commonly believed (see the articles by Morauta and Reay in May 1984), with few exceptions, social stratification of the kind familiar in the West seems to have been absent, and the attributes that most differentiated individuals were their age, sex, and clan affiliation, but most especially personal characteristics such as ambition or sloth, assertiveness or timidity. In today's more complex and unequal society, personal networks include foreigners, co-workers, and unrelated neighbors as well as wantoks and close kin. And an individual's identity may include, for example, a sense of belonging to Papua New Guinea's ‘grassroots’ and of being a ‘Highlander’ in addition to being a person from a particular Chimbu village in Simbu Province. The experience of change and multiple and sometimes conflicting identities has been captured in a spate of autobiographies (e.g., Mell 1993 and Strathern, A. 1993). Likewise, the often very personal and often difficult relationships between Papua New Guineans and outsiders is depicted in Dame Josephine Abaijah's semifictional autobiography (1991) and the accounts of expatriate women and anthropologists (e.g., Bourke et al. 1993 and Read 1986). As the following chapters show, modern PNG society is far from set and there is much experimentation and contest, especially between men and

-179-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Modern Papua New Guinea
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 424

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.